Lecture+21.Mobilization+and+Identities

Lecture+21.Mobilization+and+Identities - Lecture 20...

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Lecture 20 Concluded and Lecture 21. Mobilization and Identities Announcement: Wait till after Friday to do next week’s readings; minor adjustments may be made
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Guinier’s Alternative: Cumulative At-Large Voting (Semiproportional) multimember districts, but different from noncumulative at-large districts you get as many votes as there are representatives in a district you can cast all your votes for one candidate (hence different from noncumulative at-large voting) threshold of exclusion: 100 percent divided by number of seats as long as minority population proportion is above threshold of exclusion, minority can guarantee having a minority representative IF they choose to do so effects and advantages? [discuss]
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Advantages/Disadvantages fewer wasted votes more parties/candidates because threshold of victory is lower minorities (of any kind) can have a representative colorblind encourages participation gerrymandering not effective minority representation occurs only if people in that identity actually believe and organize around that identity because of this flexibility, encourages greater coalition building potentially complicated for voters potentially complicated for legislating
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Disenfranchisement Again? felon disenfranchisement 32 states prohibit parolees from voting 28 states prohibit those on probation from voting 12 states ban some felons from voting about 2 percent of population has lost right to vote alien voting in 1990s: about half of adult Asian Americans and 40 percent of adult Latinos can’t vote because not citizens many states allowed in earlier part of US history voter id requirements other indirect disenfranchisement efforts: longer lines at polling booth
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Noncitizenship and Representation Gap
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Lecture+21.Mobilization+and+Identities - Lecture 20...

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