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Unformatted text preview: 2008 Volunteer Salmon Watcher Program Lake Washington Watershed, Puget Sound WRIA 8 Streams, and Vashon Island March 2009 2008 Volunteer Salmon Watcher Program Lake Washington Watershed, Puget Sound WRIA 8 Streams, and Vashon Island King County Water and Land Resources Division, in cooperation with: Lake Washington/Cedar/Sammamish Watershed (WRIA 8) Forum Bellevue Stream Team Cities of Bothell, Kirkland, Redmond, Renton, Seattle, and Woodinville Snohomish County Surface Water Management Vashon-Maury Island Land Trust With support from King Conservation District A lternate Formats Available 206-296-7380 TTY Relay: 711 Summary The purpose of the Salmon Watcher Program is to document the distribution of spawning adult salmon throughout the basin via an active public outreach and education program and subsequently consolidate all the information into a single resource (this report). These data can be used by policy makers and the public to improve how aquatic resources are managed, to protect salmon and trout species, and to enhance their habitat. For the 2008 program, 109 volunteers surveyed 122 sites on 50 streams throughout the Lake Washington Watershed, other WRIA 8 streams in Central Puget Sound, and Vashon Island streams from August 23, 2008 to January 24, 2009. Because volunteers collect the data in this program, the agencies are able to obtain more information from far more locations than would otherwise be possible. However, data in this report should be used with the following factors in mind: (1) All volunteers have been trained, but volunteer expertise in locating and identifying fish species varied from very high to very low; (2) Coverage of streams by volunteers was by no means complete; (3) Volunteers view stream sites for relatively brief periods of time during the spawning season; (4) Determination of survey sites was based on volunteer availability and site accessibility (and many survey locations change from year to year, even on the same creek); (5) Adult fish can be difficult to see and therefore may have passed through reaches undetected; and (6) Volunteer data indicate only where minimum fish distributions extend to, but do not indicate reaches where fish are definitively absent (in other words, the data confirms fish presence, but does not confirm absence). Volunteers observed the following species: sockeye, kokanee, coho, chinook, and chum salmon, as well as trout. The following results were compiled from volunteer observations: (1) Sockeye had the widest distribution throughout the survey area—they were seen in 6 Lake Washington Watershed basins. They were also seen in the greatest numbers (1,664 enumerated). 2008 is the first year since the program began when coho were not the most widely observed species; (2) Coho were seen in 5 Lake Washington Watershed basins including WRIA 8 Puget Sound streams, and they were also reported on Vashon; (3) Chinook were observed in 5 Lake Washington basins; (4) Kokanee observations were observed in 2 Lake Washington basins; and (5) chum were observed in one Vashon stream and one stream in WRIA 8 that drains to Puget Sound. This report is published on the Internet and can be found using the hyperlinks on this web page: http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/animalsAndPlants/salmon-and-trout/salmonwatchers/reports.aspx. Maps included in this report have been published on the Internet and can be found using the hyperlinks on this web page: http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/animalsAndPlants/salmon-and-trout/salmonwatchers/maps.aspx. The home page for the Salmon Watcher Program web site is here: http://www.kingcounty.gov/environment/animalsandplants/salmon-and-trout/salmon-watchers.aspx. King County i 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Acknowledgements Many thanks to all the dedicated volunteers for spending many hours in what is often cold and wet weather to collect the information for this report—some for the tenth year in a row, and sometimes without ever seeing a single fish. Without the volunteers there would be no data, no maps, and no report. They help make a positive difference here in the Northwest, not only by reporting fish species, but by acting as the eyes and ears of the streams, reporting stream blockages as well as illegal and other suspect activities. They are the stewards of resources that make the Pacific Northwest so special. A huge Thank You to all our great volunteers! We also want to acknowledge the various individuals from the cooperating jurisdictions. Every year these folks meet and plan the program, organize and stage the training sessions, and invest lots of time attending to the questions of the volunteers. Thanks (in no particular order) to Laurie Devereaux, Sarah McCarthy, Holly McCracken, Debra Crawford, Peter Holte, Janet Geer, Betsy Adams, Micah Bonkowski, Gary Fink, Kollin Higgins, Hans Berge, Judy Blanco, Kit Paulsen, Wendy Collins, Suzi Wong-Swint, and Karren Gratt. Jennifer Vanderhoof is the program’s technical lead and also writes these annual reports. Finally, we would like to thank those who partially sponsored our funding: Lake Washington/Cedar/ Sammamish Watershed (WRIA 8) Forum through a King Conservation District grant. King County ii 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Table of Contents Summary.................................................................................................................... i Acknowledgements ................................................................................................. ii Table of Contents.................................................................................................... iii List of Tables........................................................................................................... iv List of Figures .......................................................................................................... v Introduction .............................................................................................................. 1 Methods .................................................................................................................... 3 Volunteer Training............................................................................................................... 3 Data Collection.................................................................................................................... 4 Quality Assurance/Quality Control ...................................................................................... 5 Results and Discussion .......................................................................................... 6 Basin Summary................................................................................................................... 7 Big Bear Creek Basin.......................................................................................................... 8 Cedar River Basin ............................................................................................................. 11 East Lake Washington Basin ............................................................................................ 13 West Lake Sammamish Basin .......................................................................................... 15 Issaquah Creek Basin....................................................................................................... 16 North Lake Washington Tributaries .................................................................................. 17 Sammamish River Tributaries........................................................................................... 19 Vashon Island ................................................................................................................... 21 Central Puget Sound......................................................................................................... 23 Volunteer Activity .................................................................................................. 25 Contact with Citizens ........................................................................................................ 26 Time Spent by Volunteers................................................................................................. 26 Limitations of Volunteer Data............................................................................................ 26 Species Summary .................................................................................................. 28 Marked Fish and Juvenile Fish ......................................................................................... 29 Chinook Salmon................................................................................................................ 29 Sockeye Salmon ............................................................................................................... 29 Coho Salmon .................................................................................................................... 31 Kokanee ............................................................................................................................ 31 Chum................................................................................................................................. 31 Trout and Unidentified Species......................................................................................... 31 References.............................................................................................................. 32 Appendix A ............................................................................................................. 33 Data Collection Form used in 2008 .................................................................................. 33 Appendix B ............................................................................................................. 35 Fauntleroy Creek Salmon Watch 2008 Summary ............................................................ 35 King County iii 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report List of Tables Table 1. Volunteer observers for the 2008 Salmon Watcher Program......................................................... 3 Table 2. Number of surveys per month during 2008 Salmon Watcher season............................................ 4 Table 3. Numbers of streams, sites, and volunteers involved in the 2008 spawning season. ..................... 6 Table 4. Species enumerated within surveyed basins during the 2008 Salmon Watcher season............... 7 Table 5. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the Big Bear Creek Basin for the 2008 spawning season................................................. 8 Table 6. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in the Big Bear Creek Basin for the 2008 spawning season. ................................................................... 8 Table 7. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the Cedar River Basin for the 2008 spawning season. ................................................... 11 Table 8. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in the Cedar River Basin for the 2008 spawning season........................................................................ 12 Table 9. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the East Lake Washington Basin for the 2008 spawning season. .................................. 13 Table 10. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in the East Lake Washington Basin for the 2008 spawning season................................................... 14 Table 11. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the West Lake Sammamish Basin for the 2008 spawning season. ................................ 15 Table 12. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in the West Lake Sammamish Basin for the 2008 spawning season................................................. 15 Table 13. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the Issaquah Creek Basin for the 2008 spawning season. ............................................. 16 Table 14. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in the Issaquah Creek Basin for the 2008 spawning season.............................................................. 16 Table 15. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the North Lake Washington Tributaries for the 2008 spawning season. ........................ 17 Table 16. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in the North Lake Washington Tributaries for the 2008 spawning season. ........................................ 18 Table 17. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the Sammamish River Tributaries for the 2008 spawning season.................................. 19 Table 18. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in the Sammamish River Tributaries for the 2008 spawning season. ................................................ 20 Table 19. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed on Vashon Island for the 2008 spawning season. .............................................................. 21 Table 20. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed on Vashon Island for the 2008 spawning season. .............................................................................. 21 Table 21. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the Central Puget Sound for the 2008 spawning season................................................ 23 Table 22. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in Central Puget Sound for the 2008 spawning season...................................................................... 23 King County iv 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Table 23. Number of citizen contacts made by all Salmon Watcher volunteers in each of the surveyed basins. ................................................................................................................................. 26 Table 24. Number of hours spent by Salmon Watcher volunteers in each of the surveyed basins........... 26 Table 25. Number of adipose fin clips as reported by volunteer Salmon Watchers. Streams are listed in order of number of adipose-clipped fish reported.................................................................. 29 Table 26. Number of sockeye observed in Bear Creek and Cedar River basins from 1999 to 2008..................................................................................................................................................... 30 List of Figures Figure 1. Basins surveyed for the 2008 Salmon Watcher Program ............................................................ 1 Figure 2. Sites surveyed by Salmon Watcher volunteers in 2008 ............................................................... 4 Figure 3. Total number of new and returning volunteers for each year of the Salmon Watcher Program. . 6 Figure 4. Observations of salmonids in the Big Bear Creek Basin .............................................................. 9 Figure 5. Observations of salmonids in the Cedar River Basin ................................................................. 12 Figure 6. Observations of salmonids in the East Lake Washington and West Lake Sammamish Basins 14 Figure 7. Observations of salmonids in the Issaquah Creek Basin ........................................................... 16 Figure 8. Observations of salmonids in the North Lake Washington Tributaries ...................................... 18 Figure 9. Observations of salmonids in the Sammamish River Tributaries ............................................... 20 Figure 10. Observations of salmonids on Vashon Island .......................................................................... 21 Figure 11. Observations of salmonids in Puget Sound Basins ................................................................. 23 Figure 12. Number of volunteers (defined as an individual, pair, or group) watching in the Lake Washington Watershed from 1997-2008. .......................................................................................... 25 Figure 13. Percentage of total fish observed in 2008 by volunteers in (a) the Lake Washington Watershed, (b) other WRIA 8 streams, and (c) Vashon Island. ......................................................... 28 Figure 14. Distribution of chinook salmon in the program area based on Salmon Watcher observations . ............................................................................................................................................................ 29 Figure 15. Distribution of sockeye salmon in the program area based on Salmon Watcher observations ............................................................................................................................................................ 30 Figure 16. Distribution of coho salmon in the program area based on Salmon Watcher observations . .. 31 Figure 17. Distribution of kokanee in the program area based on Salmon Watcher observations . ......... 31 King County v 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report This page left intentionally blank. King County vi 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Introduction The Salmon Watcher Program is a volunteer program that originated in 1996 and whose purpose is to record observations of adult fall-spawning salmonids. Volunteers are recruited and trained to identify and watch for spawning salmon throughout Water Resource Inventory Area 8 (WRIA 8), which includes the Lake Washington Watershed and some streams leading to Puget Sound (Figure 1). Volunteers are also trained to watch on Vashon Island. Regional agencies who participated in the Salmon Watcher Program along with King County during the 2008 season include the Bellevue Stream Team, the cities of Bothell, Kirkland, Redmond, Renton, Seattle, and Woodinville, Snohomish County Surface Water Management, and the Vashon-Maury Island Land Trust. The Salmon Watcher Program was initiated to expand on current efforts undertaken by resource agencies to document the distribution of spawning salmon in WRIA 8, including the Lake Washington Watershed. Basins that comprise the Lake Washington Watershed include Bear Creek, Cedar River, East Lake Washington, West Lake Sammamish, East Lake Sammamish, West Lake Sammamish, Issaquah Creek, and North Lake Washington (divided into the North Lake Washington tributaries and the Sammamish River tributaries). Other streams in WRIA 8 that were watched included Pipers Creek and Boeing Creek, both of which drain to Puget Sound. Vashon Island streams were observed as part of the Salmon Watcher Program for the eighth year in a row. Salmon Watcher volunteers annually collect information on the presence of fall-spawning salmonids, including chinook, coho, sockeye, kokanee (resident form of sockeye), and chum salmon, as well as trout species. Data of this type become more important in the region as salmonids, such as Puget Sound chinook, are listed under the Endangered Species Act. Because volunteers do this work, gathering this volume of data is accomplished with reduced agency resources, and the watersheds’ residents can become involved and educated at the same time. Further, interactions with agency personnel foster positive relationships between the public and government agencies. With current budget and time constraints of agency personnel, much of the data collected in this effort would not be collected otherwise. In addition to summaries of fish observed during the fall season, this 2008 report contains information and some statistics about the volunteers. It should be noted that this report summarizes data collected only by Salmon Watcher volunteers, and it is therefore in no way intended to be an exhaustive report of fish distribution in WRIA 8 or on Vashon. Other fish surveys are conducted annually by county, state, city, and federal agencies and non-profit organizations. For example, surveys have been conducted by volunteers or County staff to look specifically for kokanee and chinook; the results of these surveys are reported separately and are not included here. Figure 1. Basins surveyed for the 2008 Salmon Watcher Program (see http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/library/water-and-land/salmon/salmonwatcher/2008/figure1surveyed-basins-map.pdf). King County 1 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report This page left intentionally blank. King County 2 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Methods Volunteers were recruited during late summer and early fall of 2008 to observe fish in streams throughout the Lake Washington Watershed1, other WRIA 8 streams, and streams on Vashon Island. The 108 volunteers who surveyed in the project area, plus 1 individual who observed outside the project area, are listed in Table 1 (totals: 109 individuals, pairs, or groups totaling 126 people). Table 1. Volunteer observers for the 2008 Salmon Watcher Program. Ann Aagaard Eric Adman Staci Adman Walter & Ruth Albach Imogene Allen Jill & Murray Andrews Deron Artz Russ Atkins Kathleen Auld Frank Backus Neil & Gayle Baldock Ed and Sheila Barnes Richard Barrett Cathleen Barry Judith Barry Keith Bean Shirley Biccum Marilyn & Tom Blue Mamie & Chuck Bolender Dick Boyce Janet Broadus Bernice Carbaugh Lynne Cardinal Bridget & Margaret Cook James & Edna Dam Barbara Dickson Chuck Dolan Phil Doughty Brian Duchaine Amelia Dumovic Bridget DuRuz Erin Duvall Willie Elliot Gary & Bob Emerson Micheal Ess Mary Ellen Flanagan Gail Fligstein Matt Foulon Adrienne Fox Hon Cheung Fung Adrian Gan Emilia & James Gan Laurie Gogic Su and Heather Gow Doug Greaves Ron Green Patricia Gustafson Shelly Hall Katie Hart Christine Henderson Martin Ho Justin Iwen Nels Johnson Jeremy Jones Barbara Jurgens Pam Kelly Tatsu Komada Janusz Komorowski Tommy Kraft Yvonne Kuperberg Debra Lehrberger Lynne Lew Mark & Jodi Linstead Ginny Lodwig Don Mackey Ken Mackey Lisa McClary Jim McRoberts Veleda & Jerry Asher Nelson Jane Neubauer Yoshiko Otonari Tammy Parise Betty Peltzer Connie Peterman Sarah & Mark Phillips Gary Pilawski Perrilee & Dana Miller Pizzini Blake Powers Katherine Quinn-Dumovic Kelly Rau Grace Reamer David L. Reitz Larry Reymann Marian Rice Amber Riser Emma Rogers Kathleen Ryan Laura and Jim Shellooe Patty & Dave Shelton Henry Shirinyan Gary Smith Jo-Ellen Smith Eric Soshea Thomas Speer Dan Spuckler Nancy Stafford Kirk Stauffer Mike Stults Lloyd & Joan Takasugi Ross Taylor Kay Tokuda Terry Trimingham Laurie Tucker Mary Vincent Leslie Walker Mark Wilbert Maggie & Brian Windus Barbara AW Wright John Zanatta Volunteer Training Agency staff held a total of 6 classroom training sessions in 2008. Approximately 80 people attended a training sessions, and of those, 36 were returning volunteers from prior seasons. (Returning volunteers are 1 In this document, the Lake Washington Watershed means all waters draining through the Ballard Locks, and the subbasins of the Lake Washington Watershed are referred to as basins (e.g., Issaquah Creek Basin). King County 3 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report not required to attend a training every year; they are encouraged to attend a session every other year.) All volunteers were taught to identify adult spawning salmon species with a slide presentation, which was placed on King County’s web site so volunteers could review it any time. During the training sessions, volunteers signed up for one or more sites to survey. They were given salmon identification materials, including color adult salmon identification cards and spawner timing charts. Volunteers were taught how to fill out and return data forms. They were also given phone numbers to call for situations that might arise in the field, including drainage issues, fish kills, and suspicion of pollutants. Survey locations were prioritized by staff from each cooperating jurisdiction based on the need for information; however, sites were typically surveyed based on volunteer choice and availability. Volunteers were assigned to stream locations near their homes or customary walking places whenever possible. Volunteers were instructed to stay on public property (bridges, parks, etc.) unless they gained permission from the landowners to enter private property or the survey location was on their own property. Figure 2 shows all the sites watched by volunteers during the 2008 fall spawning season. Figure 2. Sites surveyed by Salmon Watcher volunteers in 2008 See http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/library/water-and-land/salmon/salmonwatcher/2008/figure2-surveyedsites-map.pdf. Data Collection Surveys were conducted between August 23, 2008 to January 31, 2009, though most surveys began in September and were concluded in December (Table 2). Volunteers were asked to watch at their survey sites for at least 15 minutes, twice per week, and record any adult salmonids they observed. Actual survey frequency and duration varied greatly among volunteers. Table 2. Number of surveys per month during 2008 Salmon Watcher season. Month August September October November December January Number of Surveys 19 386 1000 867 329 13 Volunteers counted all live and dead adult salmonids they observed. If a volunteer surveyed the same site more than one time on the same day, the highest fish count was used; however, often more than one volunteer surveyed the same site on a single day and their individual observations were used. Volunteers were asked to report only once those dead fish observed on more than one occasion and to note subsequent observations of the same fish in their comments. Juvenile fish were noted if present. Unidentified fish were counted and described when possible. Volunteers were asked if they could tell whether the fish they saw had an adipose fin. Volunteers were asked to note how many citizens they came into contact with during their streamside duties. They were also asked if they noticed anything at their site that needed to be reported and whether they reported it. All data were recorded onto field data forms (Appendix A), which were mailed to Salmon Watcher staff on a monthly basis. Volunteers were asked to fill out a “First Fish ID” form. This form had several multiple-choice questions about various key characteristics for identifying fish. Volunteers were asked to fill one of these forms out the first time they saw a new species and to turn the forms in with their data. The purpose of this form is King County 4 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report twofold: (1) to aid volunteers in identification by highlighting key characteristics, and (2) to aid Salmon Watcher staff in quality control. Quality Assurance/Quality Control Several means were used to assure that the data collected from volunteers were as accurate and consistent as possible during all phases of the program. Volunteers were provided with training by fish experts: data included in this report were collected either by returning volunteers or new volunteers who attended one of the training sessions for the 2008 season. Volunteers were provided laminated fish identification cards and a packet of training materials that included fish identification information. Duplicate as well as additional fish identification materials were placed on the Internet. Contact persons were made available to volunteers to answer questions and verify species identification when necessary; volunteers were encouraged to call upon these individuals if they were unsure of species identification. Staff receiving the data sheets screened them for anything requiring immediate attention such as an unusual fish sighting or potential water quality problems. If an unusual fish sighting were noticed on a data form, agency staff contacted the volunteer to further inquire about what characteristics were used to identify the fish. The First Fish ID forms were intended to provide another means by which fish identifications could be checked and verified. Data were input into a SQL server database housed at King County. The database has been designed to catch anomalies in data entry, such as dates not in the season. The database also poses questions when it detects that a count of a certain species has never been as high at that site in that month in previous years. These and other checks were built into the database software to increase accuracy of input data. Following data entry, the figures were verified at least once by agency staff to ensure accuracy, as well as catch anything that might need addressing. The data reviewers are familiar with the basins and the fish runs typical for the basins. Because of the limitations of usage of these data (Limitations of Volunteer Data, page 23) and despite quality control measures, the data are intended to be used only to make preliminary evaluations of the distribution of spawning salmonids in the Lake Washington Watershed and Vashon streams. King County 5 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Results and Discussion In 2008, a total of 122 sites on 50 streams were surveyed by 109 volunteers (Table 3). Table 3. Numbers of streams, sites, and volunteers involved in the 2008 spawning season. Area # streams # sites # volunteers Lake Washington Watershed Other WRIA 8 Streams Vashon Island Other (outside program area) 42 3 3 2 110 5 5 2 97 6 5 2 Total 50 122 109* *Total is not 110 because one volunteer watched sites in the Lake Washington Watershed and outside the program area. In 2008, 84 out of 107 volunteers (78.5 percent) watching in the official program area were returnees (Figure 3). The number of returning volunteers has remained consistent for several years; though because the total number of participants was lower in 2007 and again in 2008, the percentage of returning volunteers has been increasing. Of the 84 returnees, 2 pairs of volunteers have surveyed every year since the program began. Additionally, the 2 volunteers at sites outside the funded program areas were returnees. Figure 3. Total number of new and returning volunteers for each year of the Salmon Watcher Program2. new returni ng 250 # of Volunters 200 150 100 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 0 1996 50 S pa w ning Se a son 2 Note that volunteers in 2001 were from a larger geographic area. For further discussion, please see “Volunteer Activity” on page 23. King County 6 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Basin Summary For the 2008 spawning season, chinook were reported in the greatest numbers in Bear Creek Basin (Table 4). Sockeye were reported in the largest numbers in the Cedar River Basin; however, their numbers continue to decline from observations in past years (see “Species Summary,” below). The most kokanee were observed in Little Bear Creek, one of the Sammamish River tributaries. Coho were seen in the most number of basins, but they were seen in very low numbers compared to previous years. Table 4. Species enumerated within surveyed basins during the 2008 Salmon Watcher season. Basin Sockeye Trou t Unid.1 Basin Total - 80 6 29 205 - 796 - 10 840 19 - 350 15 26 469 - 20 - - - 20 22 - 9 - 2 48 Chinook Chum Coho Kokanee Big Bear Creek 83 - 16 Cedar River 21 - 13 East Lake Washington 59 - West Lake Sammamish - - 15 - Issaquah Creek North Lake Washington Tribs. Samm. River Tribs. - - - - 14 - 6 20 25 - 12 136 415 - 19 607 Vashon Island - 1 2 - - - 2 5 Central Puget Sound - WRIA 8 - 26 - - - - 7 33 - - 15 - - - - 15 203 27 99 156 1664 21 101 2271 Other2 Species Total 1 Unidentified species. 2 Outside program area. Detailed results for each basin in the program are presented below in basin groupings. Data include stream name and state stream numbers as assigned in the “stream catalog” by Williams et al. (1975), corresponding stream sites (with Site ID and river mile), dates of surveys, number of surveys, number of surveyors, and number of each species observed. The unique Site ID numbers that correspond with each survey site are used to distinguish the sites. A site, with its unique ID number, will always have the same data associated with it, regardless of refined river mile (RM) designations. River mile designations are generally derived from the stream catalog combined with measurements made using King County’s Geographic Information System. Additionally, a designated site may vary a few feet from year to year: (1) if a volunteer watches on the upstream side of a bridge versus the downstream side, (2) if a new volunteer happens to watch a few yards from where a previous watcher observed, or (3) if a volunteer moves a few feet to observe in an area of better spawning habitat or visibility. Maps are presented for each basin in the program area and depict observations of sockeye, coho, chinook, kokanee, and chum identified during the survey. The streams surveyed in the Lake Washington Watershed were grouped into the following basins: Big Bear Creek, Cedar River, East Lake Washington, West Lake Sammamish, Issaquah Creek, and North Lake Washington (split into North Lake Washington tributaries and Sammamish River tributaries). Salmonids were observed in all basins surveyed in 2008. Trout and unidentified species were not mapped. King County 7 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Big Bear Creek Basin Volunteers surveyed 13 sites in 4 streams in the Big Bear Creek Basin in 2008 (Figure 2). From 1 to 7 sites were watched per stream, and the total number of surveys ranged from 1 to 34 per site (Table 6). Each site was monitored by 1 or 2 volunteers. Table 5. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers3, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the Big Bear Creek Basin for the 2008 spawning season. Stream Stream # Big Bear Creek 080105 Trib. to Bear Cottage Lake Cr. 080122 Struve Creek 080131 Site ID RM Survey Dates # Surveys # Vols. 65 101 89 136 529 106 466 90 102 50 395 638 364 2.7 4.9 6 7.4 8.7 10 11.6 0.2 0.6 2.2 2.7 3.2 0.3 9/8 - 10/25 9/20 - 11/13 8/30 - 12/14 9/8 - 12/3 10/5 - 11/24 10/4 - 11/29 9/9 - 11/29 11/1 - 12/14 9/28 - 11/7 9/8 - 11/17 9/9 - 11/10 10/5 9/13 - 12/27 17 15 32 32 10 6 19 14 10 34 22 1 17 2 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 Years Watched 1997-2000, 2002-2008 1997-2008 1998-2008 1998-2008 2002, 2003, 2008 1998, 2006-2008 2001, 2006-2008 1998-2008 1997, 1998, 2001-2006, 2008 1997, 1999-2008 2002, 2003, 2008 2008 2001-2003, 2008 Salmonids were found in 2 of the 4 streams observed in Big Bear Creek Basin (Table 7): Bear Creek and Cottage Lake Creek. Chinook, coho, and sockeye were all seen in Bear Creek and its primary tributary, Cottage Lake Creek. Table 6. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in the Big Bear Creek Basin for the 2008 spawning season. Stream Big Bear Creek Site ID RM 65 2.7 101* 4.9 89 6 136 7.4 529 8.7 106 10 466 11.6 Trib. to Bear 90 0.2 102 0.6 Cottage Lake Cr. 50* 2.2 395 2.7 638 3.2 Struve Creek 364 0.3 *Trout also observed at this location. Chinook Coho Kokanee Sockeye Unid. 1 (10/8) 8 (9/28 - 10/22) 15 (9/14 - 10/26) 1 (9/22) 30 (9/21 - 10/16) 28 (9/21 - 10/17) - 5 (11/1 - 11/2) 10 (11/7 - 11/10) 1 (10/9) - - 4 (10/8 - 10/14) 41 (9/28 - 10/25) 8 (10/5 - 10/26) 2 (10/14) 9 (9/28 - 10/11) 13 (9/21 - 11/1) 3 (11/3 - 11/10) - 2 (10/8) 4 (10/4 - 10/8) - 3 “Volunteer,” when used in this context, is defined as an individual, pair, or group of people who observed a stream site for adult spawning salmonids at a given time on a given date. King County 8 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report The observations of sockeye, coho, and chinook in the Big Bear Creek Basin determined from volunteer surveys are shown in Figure 4. Figure 4. Observations of salmonids in the Big Bear Creek Basin See http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/library/water-and-land/salmon/salmonwatcher/2008/figure4-big-bearsalmonids-map.pdf. King County 9 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report This page left intentionally blank. King County 10 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Cedar River Basin Volunteers surveyed 19 sites in 7 streams in the Cedar River Basin in 2008 (Figure 2). From 1 to 5 sites were watched per stream, and the total number of surveys ranged from 3 to 60 per site (Table 7). Each site was monitored by 1 or 2 volunteers. Table 7. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the Cedar River Basin for the 2008 spawning season. Stream Site ID RM Survey Dates # Surveys # Vols. 080299 201 205 555 139 1.3 2.9 6.2 6.4 1 1 1 1 2001, 2005, 2007, 2008 1999, 2001, 2005-2008 2008 1997-2008 19.7 9/7 - 12/7 9/10 - 11/29 9/13 - 9/27 10/29 - 1/24/09 8/23 - 12/4 15 13 3 23 613 Cedar River Strea m# 21 1 2005-2008 (Cavanaugh Pond) C.R. Side Channel John's Creek Kennydale Creek Rock Creek Years Watched - 557 0.15 8/23 - 12/12 43 2 2003, 2005- 2008 591 0 10/4 - 11/24 6 1 2005-2008 590 0.1 10/4 - 11/8 5 1 2005, 2007, 2008 410 0.2 10/7 - 12/10 42 1 2001-2008 154 0.4 10/7 - 11/14 11 1 1999-2008 363 1.2 10/2 - 12/4 9 1 2001, 2002, 2008 49 1.3 8/27 - 12/4 27 2 1998-2008 437 1.6 8/27 - 12/4 16 1 2000, 2005, 2006, 2008 080320 Taylor Creek* 588 0.37 9/26 - 12/13 60 2 2004-2008 596 0.5 10/7 - 12/10 42 1 2004-2008 129 1.2 10/7 - 11/14 11 1 1998-2008 71 1.8 8/23 - 12/5 31 2 1998-2008 126 2.4 10/7 - 11/14 11 1 1998, 2001-2008 080341 Walsh Lake Div. 460 0.1 8/23 - 12/4 22 1 2003, 2005-2008 *Taylor Creek, a tributary to the Cedar River, not to be confused with the Taylor Creek that is a tributary to Lake Washington in the City of Seattle. 080338 Chinook and sockeye were once again observed at the most upstream location watched in the Cedar River: at river mile 19.7, the train trestle at Big Bend Natural Area (Table 8). Walsh Lake Diversion was the only other stream chinook were observed by volunteers in the Cedar Basin, and it was the only location coho were reported. Sockeye were seen in six of the seven streams surveyed in the basin. No adult salmon were reported in Kennydale Creek, which was only observed 5 times during the season. King County 11 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Table 8. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in the Cedar River Basin for the 2008 spawning season. Stream Site ID RM Chinook Coho Sockeye Unidentified Cedar River 201 205 555 139 1.3 2.9 6.2 6.4 613 557 591 590 410 154 363 49 437 588 596 129 71 126 19.7 0.15 0 0.1 0.2 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.6 0.37 0.5 1.2 1.8 2.4 1 (10/18) 16 (9/21 - 10/16) - - 330 (9/27 - 12/7) 20 (9/28 - 11/7) 3 (9/20 - 9/20) 52 (11/30 - 12/23) 303 (9/21 - 11/6) 3 (10/16 - 11/6) 1 (11/24) 1 (10/7) 1 (10/27) 60 (10/8 - 11/5) - 1 (10/17) 1 (10/15) 6 (10/17 - 10/17) - 460 0.1 4 (10/28 - 11/21) 13 (11/10 - 12/4) 22 (10/16 - 11/10) 2 (11/21 - 12/4) (Cavanaugh Pond) C.R. Side Channel John's Creek Kennydale Creek Rock Creek Taylor Creek Walsh Lake Diversion The observations of sockeye, chinook, and coho in the Cedar River Basin determined from volunteer surveys are shown in Figure 5. Figure 5. Observations of salmonids in the Cedar River Basin See http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/library/water-and-land/salmon/salmonwatcher/2008/figure5-cedarriver-salmonids-map.pdf. King County 12 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report East Lake Washington Basin Volunteers surveyed 30 sites in 12 streams and 4 beach sites in the East Lake Washington Basin in 2008 (Figure 2). From 1 to 6 sites were watched per stream, and the total number of surveys ranged from 3 to 130 per site (Table 9). Each site was monitored by 1 to 6 volunteers. Table 9. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the East Lake Washington Basin for the 2008 spawning season. Stream Stream # Site ID RM Survey Dates # Surveys # Vols. Coal Creek 080268 440 439 46 441 442 0.1 0.6 0.8 2 2.1 10/1 - 12/8 10/2 - 11/28 10/5 - 12/9 10/1 - 12/31 9/16 - 12/31 23 18 24 34 85 1 1 1 1 5 Cochran Springs Creek East Creek Forbes Creek Kelsey Creek 080253 197 0.15 11/1 - 12/28 16 1 514 194 13 124 120 0.2 0.9 2 2.4 3 9/12 - 12/6 10/1 - 11/26 8/31 - 12/31 8/29 - 12/11 9/12 - 12/1 22 8 40 32 25 1 1 2 2 2 216 4.5 9/18 - 10/30 13 1 586 45 4.9 5 9/13 - 12/13 9/13 - 11/29 23 24 1 1 76 30.5 9/17 - 9/28 4 1 130 51 306 208 432 445 75 27 80 48 32.4 35.9 63.6 0.2 0.5 1.6 0.4 0.7 1.6 0 10/4 - 1/31/09 9/12 - 12/8 9/17 - 10/6 9/6 - 12/17 9/6 - 12/17 8/31 - 12/31 8/29 - 12/11 8/29 - 12/11 9/17 - 12/9 11/1 - 12/28 24 42 3 31 24 130 26 68 30 16 1 1 1 2 1 6 1 3 2 1 2003, 2005-2008 2000-2002, 2008 1997- 2008 1997- 2008 1997- 2008 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2007, 2008 2004-2008 1997-2000, 2003, 2006-2008 1997, 1998, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2008 1998, 2007, 2008 1998, 2007, 2008 1997, 2008 2001- 2008 2000, 2004-2008 2001, 2003-2008 1998-2000, 2007, 2008 1997-2008 1998, 2002-2008 2002-2004, 2006-2008 117 221 116 506 73 0.25 0.7 0.25 0.9 1.1 10/6 - 12/26 9/15 - 12/17 9/12 - 12/15 8/30 - 12/17 9/30 - 12/15 24 27 71 30 11 1 1 5 2 1 1997-1999, 2001-2008 1999-2008 1998, 1999, 2001-2008 2002-2008 1998, 2000, 2004-2008 Lake Wa. Beach 080242 080259 080028 May Creek 080282 Mercer Slough Richards Creek 080259 080261 Sears Creek Sturtevant Creek Valley Creek West Trib. Kelsey Cr. 080260 080266 080264 Years Watched 2001-2004, 2008 2001-2005, 2008 1997- 2005, 2008 2001- 2008 2001-2008 2000, 2005, 2006, 2008 Salmonids were found in 6 of the 12 streams surveyed in 2008 and also at one Lake Washington beach (Table 10). Chinook were seen in Kelsey Creek, Mercer Slough, West Trib. Kelsey Creek, and Richards Creek, all of which are part of the same Kelsey Creek system. Chinook were also seen in May Creek. Coho were reported at one Lake Washington Beach site, as were sockeye and fish of unidentified species. Aside from the beach, coho were seen in only two streams in low numbers, and sockeye were seen in only May Creek and Mercer Slough. Coho were the only species observed in Coal Creek. No fish were observed in Cochran Springs, East, Forbes, Sears, Sturtevant, or Valley creeks. King County 13 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Note that coho can be very difficult to identify. Chinook in Kelsey Creek are often very red in color and the same size as coho therefore easily misidentified as coho. Coho's low numbers in this system combined with their very skittish behavior and tendency to show up in bad weather and late in the season makes a volunteer's chances of seeing coho in Kelsey Creek rather slim. Table 10. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in the East Lake Washington Basin for the 2008 spawning season. Site ID RM Chinook Coho Sockeye Unid. 440 439 46 441 442 0.1 0.6 0.8 2 2.1 - 8 (11/17 - 11/28) 3 (11/15 - 11/16) - - 197 514 194 13 124* 120 216 586 45 Lake Wa. Beach 76 130 51 306 May Creek 208* 432 Mercer Slough 445 Richards Creek 75 27* 80 Sears Creek 48 Sturtevant Creek 117 Valley Creek 221 West Trib. Kelsey 116 Cr. 506 73 *Trout also observed at this location. 0.15 0.2 0.9 2 2.4 3 4.5 4.9 5 30.5 32.4 35.9 63.6 0.2 0.5 1.6 0.4 0.7 1.6 0 0.25 0.7 0.25 0.9 1.1 4 (9/21 - 10/8) 5 (9/24 - 10/4) 8 (9/22 - 11/6) 16 (10/1 - 10/29) 5 (10/16 - 10/23) 21 (9/24 - 10/29) - 2 (11/7) 2 (10/31 - 11/10) 4 (10/20 - 10/31) - 3 (11/26 - 11/27) 204 (10/7 - 11/19) 140 (10/4 - 11/18) 3 (10/10 - 10/30) - 3 (9/21 - 10/21) 4 (10/19 - 12/11) 8 (9/22 - 12/6) 4 (9/21 - 10/22) 1 (11/1) 6 (9/24 - 11/23) - Stream Coal Creek Cochran Springs Creek East Creek Forbes Creek Kelsey Creek The observations of sockeye, chinook, and coho in the East Lake Washington Basin determined from volunteer surveys are shown in Figure 6. Figure 6. Observations of salmonids in the East Lake Washington and West Lake Sammamish Basins See http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/library/water-and-land/salmon/salmonwatcher/2008/figure6-e-lkwashington-sammamish-map.pdf. King County 14 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report West Lake Sammamish Basin Volunteers surveyed 5 sites on 2 streams in the West Lake Sammamish Basin in 2008 (Table 11). From 7 to 30 surveys were conducted per site. Each site was monitored by 1 volunteer. Table 11. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the West Lake Sammamish Basin for the 2008 spawning season. Stream Stream # Site ID RM Survey Dates # Surveys # Vols. Idylwood Cr. 080143 Lewis Creek 080162 423 599 327 598 283 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.4 0.5 10/8 - 12/4 10/1 - 11/22 9/15 - 12/2 11/7 - 12/31 11/7 - 11/29 13 10 18 30 7 1 1 1 1 1 Years Watched 2000-2008 2006, 2008 1997, 2001-2008 2004-2008 1999, 2001-2008 Kokanee were observed at one site in Lewis Creek (Table 12). No fish were observed in Idylwood Creek. Observations of kokanee in the West Lake Sammamish Basin determined from volunteer surveys are shown above in Figure 6, “Observations of Salmonids in the East Lake Washington and West Lake Sammamish Basins.” Table 12. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in the West Lake Sammamish Basin for the 2008 spawning season. Stream Idylwood Cr. Lewis Creek King County Site ID RM Kokanee Unidentified 423 599 327 598 283 0.1 0.2 0.1 0.4 0.5 20 (11/9 - 11/24) - - 15 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Issaquah Creek Basin Volunteers surveyed 5 sites in 4 streams in Issaquah Creek Basin in 2008 (Figure 2). The total number of surveys ranged from 7 to 42 per site (Table 13). Each site was monitored by 1 or 2 volunteers. Table 13. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the Issaquah Creek Basin for the 2008 spawning season. Carey Creek E. Fork Issaquah Creek Stream # Site ID RM Survey Dates # Surveys # Vols. 080218 080183 635 637 1.7 0.4 10/16 - 12/24 9/23 - 12/7 42 16 2 1 6 Stream 3.2 10/2 - 12/15 7 1 Issaquah Creek 080178 52 5.8 9/12 - 12/8 21 1 Tibbetts Creek 080169 108 0.3 9/15 - 12/2 18 1 Years Watched 2007, 2008 2007, 2008 1997, 1999-2002, 2006, 2008 1998-2000, 2003-2008 1998, 1999, 2000, 2004, 2008 In 2008, coho were reported in Carey Creek for the first time by volunteers since 1996 (Table 14). Chinook were the only species reported in Issaquah Creek, and these were seen well upstream of the hatchery. Chinook, coho, and sockeye were reported in East Fork Issaquah Creek. No adult salmon were reported in Tibbetts Creek. Table 14. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in the Issaquah Creek Basin for the 2008 spawning season. Stream Carey Creek E. Fork Issaquah Creek Issaquah Creek Tibbetts Creek Site ID RM Chinook Coho Sockeye Unid. 635 637 6 52 108 1.7 0.4 3.2 5.8 0.3 12 (9/30 - 10/15) 3 (10/3 - 10/10) - 10 (11/11 - 11/30) 12 (11/1 - 11/27) - 9 (10/12 - 11/11) - 2 (10/7) - The distributions of chinook, coho, and sockeye in the Issaquah Creek Basin determined from volunteer observations are shown in Figure 7. Figure 7. Observations of salmonids in the Issaquah Creek Basin See http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/library/water-and-land/salmon/salmonwatcher/2008/figure7-issaquahcreek-salmonids.pdf. King County 16 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report North Lake Washington Tributaries The North Lake Washington Tributaries are those streams flowing into the north end of Lake Washington (e.g., McAleer, and Thornton creeks, the Sammamish River). Volunteers surveyed 20 sites in 8 streams in 2008 (Figure 2). From 1 to 6 sites were watched per stream, and the total number of surveys ranged from 4 to 30 per site (Table 15). Each site was monitored by 1 or 2 volunteers. Table 15. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the North Lake Washington Tributaries for the 2008 spawning season. Stream # Site ID RM Survey Dates # Surveys # Vols. Juanita Creek 080230 Lyon Creek McAleer Creek 080049 Peters Creek S. Fk. Thornton Cr. 080104 080033 411 196 427 144 498 266 56 314 315 452 0.7 1.4 0 0.3 0.8 0.8 1.1 1.6 2.1 0.5 10/7 - 11/30 10/2 - 12/22 9/1 - 10/27 9/28 - 11/30 10/7 - 11/30 10/4 - 11/30 9/21 - 11/30 9/21 - 11/30 9/21 - 11/30 10/4 - 12/13 7 27 7 4 7 10 12 8 7 15 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 2000, 2004-2008 2000-2002, 2008 2000, 2003-2005, 2008 1997, 2001-2008 2001-2008 1999- 2008 1997-2006, 2008 1997, 2000- 2006, 2008 1997, 2001- 2006, 2008 2002- 2008 Thornton Creek 080030 192 527 183 184 91 186 386 528 0.7 1.2 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.9 1.1 2.8 10/5 - 11/30 9/22 - 12/22 9/22 - 12/23 10/4 - 11/15 10/3 - 11/30 10/2 - 11/26 9/25 - 12/20 9/24 - 12/22 11 30 28 9 14 13 19 27 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 Trib 0141 to Sammamish River Woodin Creek 080141 352 0.2 9/20 - 12/6 22 1 228 0.3 9/21 - 12/13 10 1 1999-2004, 2006-2008 2002-2008 1997, 2000-2008 1999-2003, 2006-2008 1998-2000, 2003, 2008 1997, 1999-2002, 2006-2008 2002, 2005, 2007, 2008 2002- 2008 1999-2001, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008 1999, 2002, 2003, 2006-2008 Stream - Years Watched Salmonids were found in 3 of the 8 streams surveyed in the North Lake Washington Tributaries (Table 16). No chinook or coho were observed in any creek in this basin. Sockeye were observed in McAleer Creek. A single fish each was reported in Juanita Creek and Thornton Creek, and neither were identified to species. No salmonids were seen in Peters Creek, South Fork Thornton Creek, Woodin Creek, or a tributary to the Sammamish River. King County 17 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Table 16. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in the North Lake Washington Tributaries for the 2008 spawning season. Stream Juanita Creek Lyon Creek McAleer Creek Peters Creek South Fk. Thornton Creek Thornton Creek Trib 0141 to Sammamish River Woodin Creek Site ID RM Chinook Coho Sockeye Unid. 411 196 427 144 498 266 56 314 315 452 192 527 183 184 91 186 386 528 0.7 1.4 0 0.3 0.8 0.8 1.1 1.6 2.1 0.5 0.7 1.2 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.9 1.1 2.8 - - 14 (11/2 - 11/9) - 1 (11/1) 1 (11/2) 3 (10/26) 1 (10/23) - 352 0.2 - - - - 228 0.3 - - - - The distribution of sockeye in the North Lake Washington Tributaries determined from volunteer observations is shown in Figure 8. Figure 8. Observations of salmonids in the North Lake Washington Tributaries See http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/library/water-and-land/salmon/salmonwatcher/2008/figure8-n-lkwashington-salmonids-map.pdf. King County 18 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Sammamish River Tributaries The Sammamish River Tributaries are those streams flowing into the Sammamish River from waters originating in Snohomish County (Little Bear, North, and Swamp creeks; Big Bear Creek is discussed separately above). Volunteers surveyed 18 sites on 4 Sammamish River tributaries in 2008 (Figure 2). From 1 to 10 sites were watched per stream, and the total number of surveys ranged from 2 to 40 per site (Table 17). Each site was monitored by 1 or 2 volunteers. Table 17. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the Sammamish River Tributaries for the 2008 spawning season. Stream Stream # Little Bear Creek 080080 Little Swamp Creek North Creek 080060 080070 Swamp Creek 080059 Site ID RM Survey Dates # Surveys # Vols. Years Watched 114 640 67 175 14 505 438 112 57* 408 483 113 625 425 253 553 34 321 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 1.9 0.24 0.01 0.9 0.95 1.05 1.4 1.5 1.7 2.6 3 3.6 0.3 1.7 9/10 - 12/19 10/14 - 12/3 10/14 - 12/3 9/21 - 12/13 9/22 - 10/30 9/9 - 11/30 9/16 - 11/4 9/28 - 11/1 9/23 - 12/20 9/29 - 11/1 9/10 - 10/27 9/23 - 12/17 10/7 - 12/17 9/10 - 12/17 9/16 - 12/13 9/16 - 9/28 9/9 - 11/30 10/1 - 12/20 31 10 10 10 15 24 3 7 40 7 18 18 22 21 17 2 35 32 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1999, 2001, 2002, 2005-2008 2008 1997-1999, 2001- 2008 1997, 2000, 2002, 2006-2008 1999, 2000, 2002-2004, 2006-2008 2002-2008 2000, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2008 1998- 2008 1998, 2001, 2004- 2008 2000-2008 2002, 2007, 2008 1998, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2006- 2008 2007, 2008 2006, 2008 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2006-2008 2003, 2006- 2008 1997, 1999, 2000, 2002-2008 1997, 2001, 2007, 2008 *In 2004, site 408 was remapped; however, the river mile designations were not corrected. As a result, sites 57 and 408 have been numerically reversed since then. These numbers have now been corrected. Salmonids were found in 3 of the 4 streams surveyed (Table 18). Chinook, coho, and sockeye were all observed in North Creek. Chinook, kokanee, and sockeye were reported in Little Bear Creek, as in 2007. However, professional surveyors found residual sockeye but no kokanee in Little Bear Creek, so it is very likely the kokanee reported by volunteers in Little Bear Creek were in many or most cases actually residual sockeye (for more information, see the sections on Sockeye and Kokanee below). The only fish reported in Swamp Creek was a single fish not identified to species; this was the first adult salmon observed in Swamp Creek by volunteer Salmon Watchers since 2003. No fish were observed in Little Swamp Creek. King County 19 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Table 18. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in the Sammamish River Tributaries for the 2008 spawning season. Stream Little Bear Creek Little Swamp Creek North Creek Swamp Creek Site ID RM 114 640 67 175 14 505 438 112 57* 408 483 113 625 425 253 553 34 321 Chinook Coho Kokanee Sockeye Unid. 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 1.9 20 (9/22 - 10/17) - 77 (10/30 - 11/9) 43 (10/14 - 11/17) 16 (10/14 - 11/9) - 5 (10/30 - 11/1) 14 (10/14 - 10/24) 7 (10/14 - 11/1) 2 (10/19 - 10/25) - 2 (10/12 - 10/19) - 0.24 0.01 0.9 0.95 1.05 1.4 1.5 1.7 2.6 3 3.6 0.3 1.7 2 (9/29) 3 (9/28) - 9 (10/13 - 11/3) 2 (11/1) 1 (11/25) - - 22 (10/5 - 10/21) 187 (10/6 - 11/17) 25 (10/15 - 11/1) 17 (10/16 - 10/27) 20 (10/14 - 10/27) 116 (10/16 - 11/27) - 1 (11/1) 5 (10/4 - 11/15) 1 (10/19) 6 (10/14 - 10/15) 3 (9/13 - 10/17) 1 (11/19) The distributions of chinook, coho, sockeye, and kokanee in the Sammamish River Tributaries determined from volunteer observations are shown in Figure 9. Figure 9. Observations of salmonids in the Sammamish River Tributaries See http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/library/water-and-land/salmon/salmonwatcher/2008/figure9sammamish-river-salmonids-map.pdf. King County 20 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Vashon Island Volunteers surveyed 6 sites in 4 streams on Vashon Island in 2008 (Figure 2). From 1 to 3 sites were watched per stream, and the total number of surveys ranged from 1 to 20 per site (Table 19). All sites were monitored by 1 or 2 volunteers each. Table 19. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed on Vashon Island for the 2008 spawning season. Stream # Fisher Creek Judd Creek Shinglemill Creek Site ID RM Survey Dates # Surveys # Vols. 485 492 146 147 0.1 0.25 0 0.2 11/18 11/9 - 1/10/09 10/20 - 12/12 10/20 - 12/12 1 21 20 20 1 1 2 2 148 Stream 0.5 10/12 - 1/24/09 8 1 150129 150159 Years Watched 2001-2003, 2005, 2007, 2008 2001-2003, 2005, 2006, 2008 1998, 2001-2008 1998, 2001-2004, 2008 1998, 2001-2003, 2005, 2006, 2008 Salmonids were found in extremely low numbers in 2 of the 3 streams surveyed (Table 20). A single chum was observed in Fisher Creek. Two coho and two unidentified species were reported in Judd Creek. No fish were observed in Shinglemill Creek. Table 20. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed on Vashon Island for the 2008 spawning season. Stream Fisher Creek Judd Creek Shinglemill Creek Site ID RM Chum Coho Unid. 485 492 146 147 148 0.1 0.25 0 0.2 0.5 1 (11/18) - 2 (11/9) - 2 (11/25) - The distribution of chum and coho on Vashon Island determined from volunteer observations is shown in Figure 10. Figure 10. Observations of salmonids on Vashon Island See http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/library/water-and-land/salmon/salmonwatcher/2008/figure10-vashonsalmonids-map.pdf. King County 21 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report This page left intentionally blank. King County 22 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Central Puget Sound Streams draining to Puget Sound that were surveyed during the 2008 Salmon Watcher season are both inside and outside WRIA 8 (Table 21). Those streams within WRIA 8 include Boeing Creek, Pipers Creek, and Venema Creek. Longfellow Creek, watched annually, is part of WRIA 94. A total of 7 sites in 4 streams draining to Puget Sound were watched in 2008. All sites were monitored by a single volunteer. Table 21. Stream number, site ID, site location (listed in river miles, RM), survey dates, total number of surveys, number of volunteers, and years the sites were watched for each stream surveyed in the Central Puget Sound for the 2008 spawning season. Stream Boeing Creek* Longfellow Creek Pipers Creek* Stream # Site ID RM Survey Dates # Surveys # Vols. 080017 090360 080023 436 179 70 181 98 99 383 0.1 0.8 0 0.2 0.4 0.53 0.02 10/16 - 12/11 10/26 - 12/7 10/4 - 12/12 10/4 - 12/7 6 6 15 12 1 1 1 1 2000-2008 1998-2008 1999-2005, 2007, 2008 1999-2002, 2004-2008 11/22 10/9 - 12/16 1 19 1 1 1998-2002, 2007, 2008 1999, 2002-2004, 2008 10/4 - 12/29 18 1 2000, 2001, 2004-2008 Venema Creek* *Streams within WRIA 8. Years Watched Adult salmon were seen in Pipers and Venema Creek (Table 22) (this discussion does not include Vashon streams; for discussion of Vashon Island streams, see section above). For the first time since 1998, no adult fish were seen in Longfellow Creek by volunteers. And for the first time since our Boeing Creek volunteer began reporting in 2000, no fish were seen in that creek either. Chum were observed at all but the most-upstream site in Pi pers Creek. The only fish observed in Venema Creek was not identified to species. The observations of chum in the Central Puget Sound streams determined from volunteer surveys is shown in Figure 11. Table 22. Site ID, RM, and fish counts (live and dead) with dates seen at each stream surveyed in Central Puget Sound for the 2008 spawning season. Stream Boeing Creek* Longfellow Creek Pipers Creek* Venema Creek* *Streams within WRIA 8. Site ID RM Chum Coho Unidentified 436 179 70 181 98 99 383 0.1 0.8 0 0.2 0.4 0.53 0.02 9 (11/16 - 12/6) 12 (11/29 - 12/6) 5 (11/22) - - 1 (11/23) 5 (11/8 - 11/23) 1 (11/22) Figure 11. Observations of salmonids in Puget Sound basins. See: http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/library/water-and-land/salmon/salmonwatcher/2008/figure11-pugetsound-tribs-salmonid-map.pdf. 4 Fauntleroy Creek, a WRIA 9 stream that drains to Puget Sound, is also watched by volunteers; however, survey methods are different from those of this program. See Appendix B for a summary of salmonid observations at Fauntleroy Creek in 2007. King County 23 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report This page left intentionally blank. King County 24 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Volunteer Activity The trend in the number of volunteers participating in the Salmon Watcher Program has varied over the 13 years of the program (Figure 12; data for 1996 not cataloged). Many volunteers watch more than one site, and many sites have more than one volunteer watching at it. The last 5 years have been relatively consistent in terms of numbers of volunteers, sites, and streams in the program. However, the trend since 2006 has been decreased volunteer participation, mostly with new recruits. Reasons for this trend are unknown; however, as a result, recruitment efforts, which have gone unchanged since at least 2005, will be changed and increased for the 2009 season. Program partners have anecdotally reported drops in volunteer participation in other programs as well, so it may be that volunteerism is down as a whole. Figure 12. Number of volunteers (defined as an individual, pair, or group) watching in the Lake Washington Watershed from 19975-2008. 250 # s ites # volunteers # s tre am s 200 150 100 50 0 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 5 See previous Salmon Watcher annual reports for details on yearly participation. King County 25 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Contact with Citizens Volunteers were asked to keep track of how many citizens they came into contact with during their time by the streams. Salmon Watcher volunteers spoke with at least 671 citizens during the 2008 spawning season. Table 23 details the numbers of citizens who interacted with volunteers. Big Bear Creek Cedar River E. Lake Wash. W. Lake Samm. Issaquah Creek N. Lake Wash. Samm. River Tribs. Vashon Island Puget Sound Table 23. Number of citizen contacts made by all Salmon Watcher volunteers in each of the surveyed basins. 100 94 206 2 10 61 92 32 73 Time Spent by Volunteers Salmon Watcher volunteers are asked to record the start and end times of each site visit. Those times are used to calculate the amount of time volunteers spend watching stream-side. Occasionally, some volunteers do not fill in that part of the data sheet. Additionally, some volunteers watched twice a day, and only one time period is included in these calculations. Time underestimates notwithstanding, Table 24 illustrates the approximate amount of time spent by volunteers in each basin. More than 860 hours were volunteered during the 2008 Salmon Watcher season. Issaquah Creek N. Lake Wash. Samm. River Tribs. Vashon Puget Sound E. Lake Wash. 176.43 315.58 W. Lake Samm. 76.72 Cedar River Big Bear Creek Table 24. Number of hours spent by Salmon Watcher volunteers in each of the surveyed basins. 15 30.05 99.12 94.93 23.02 27.98 Limitations of Volunteer Data Individuals, citizen groups, non-profit organizations, and government agencies all use data from the Salmon Watcher Program for various reasons (for an extensive list of reasons, please see the report from the 2000 Salmon Watcher season, Vanderhoof 2001). However, several qualifications must be kept in mind when reviewing the data in this report and especially when using the data for any purpose other than describing fish presence. The level of expertise of the volunteers varies widely: some volunteers have past experience identifying fish through professional or school training, recreational fishing, or personal interest. Other volunteers learned to identify salmon for the first time from the Salmon Watcher training session. For additional discussion on the limitations of volunteer data, please see previous reports (e.g., King County 2004). Every year volunteers from previous years return and new volunteers enter the program who must learn to identify the different species of salmonids they might encounter in their assigned streams. In 2008, 78 percent of Lake Washington Watershed volunteers were returnees (see the beginning of the Results and King County 26 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Discussion section above). The number of returning volunteers has remained somewhat consistent for the past 5 years; therefore, the level of accuracy has likely been relatively consistent during this time period. Although training sessions are thorough, identification materials are provided, and technical experts are available for help with identification, some misidentifications will occur. It is important to keep in mind that the absence of spawner sightings in a stream does not mean that spawning salmonids are not accessing that location. It does mean that fish were not seen by the volunteer at the site at the time of survey. Because of this important distinction and the other mentioned limitations of this type of survey, data in this report should be used only to indicate the presence of adult salmon at specific locations (species distribution). All other uses derived from the compilation of this data should be used cautiously and with the specific limitations of the data in mind. With very few exceptions, because most or all of these parameters are different for every stream surveyed from 1996 through 2008, comparisons of raw data likely would not yield valid information about changes in populations. Therefore, the best use for the fish data is in determining presence of fish and mapping fish distribution. King County 27 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Species Summary Salmon Watcher Program volunteers recorded observations of all salmonid fish located during their stationary surveys, including chinook, coho, chum, and sockeye salmon, kokanee, and trout (which may have been cutthroat or rainbow trout). The ratios of all fish observed, including unidentified fish, is depicted in Figure 13a a for the Lake Washington Watershed, 13b for WRIA 8 streams that drain to Puget Sound, and 13c for Vashon Island. Of the 48 streams in the study area surveyed in 2008, sockeye were found in 13 streams and at one Lake Washington beach. Coho were found in 10 streams and one beach site, chinook in 13 streams, kokanee were reported in 2 streams, and trout were reported in 5 streams. Sockeye was the most abundant species counted by volunteers in the Lake Washington Watershed, followed by chinook then kokanee (however, see discussion below, as some kokanee may have been residual sockeye). Chum were observed in 2 streams, including 1 on Vashon Island and 1 in Pipers Creek. If a volunteer was unable to positively identify what species a fish was, the fish was tallied as “unidentified” (reporting a fish as unidentified was preferable to falsely identifying a species). Of the 2,256 total adult fish observed in the Lake Washington Watershed, Vashon Island, and other WRIA 8 streams in 2008, 101 were tallied as unidentified (4.5 percent). Unidentified adult salmonids were counted in 20 streams and one Lake Washington beach. Figure 13. Percentage of total fish observed in 2008 by volunteers in (a) the Lake Washington Watershed, (b) other WRIA 8 streams, and (c) Vashon Island. (a) Lake Wash in g to n Wate r sh e d (b) W RIA 8 P uget S ound Stre a m s unid 21% trou 1% unid 4% chin 9% c oho 4% koka 7% chum 79% (c) Vashon Island chum 20% unid 40% sock 75% coho 40% King County 28 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Marked Fish and Juvenile Fish On the data forms, one column asked the volunteers to note the “# of fish without adipose.” Hatcheries in the Lake Washington Watershed remove the adipose fins of chinook and coho before they are released into the stream. Volunteers were instructed to focus on species identification first and foremost and only try to report on adipose fin clips when possible. Most volunteers did not fill in this column, or sometimes they noted they could not tell. Generally, water clarity must be excellent and the fish must be close and somewhat still in order to determine the presence of an adipose fin on a live fish. No sockeye from hatcheries in the Lake Washington Watershed had their adipose fins clipped. However, volunteers reported 3 sockeye without adipose fins (Table 25). Because sockeye are too small to have their adipose fins clipped when they are released from hatcheries, their adipose fins remain intact. Therefore, if sockeye are reported with missing adipose fins, either the fish are sockeye with adipose fins that were difficult to see in the stream, or the fish were another species such as coho who were missing their adipose fins. The number of sockeye reported as being clipped in 2008 was very low (0.18 percent of all sockeye). In some years, certain species of salmon are tagged for scientific research when they enter the Ballard Locks. Volunteers are asked to record when they see tagged fish, and they are asked to notify a staff member. In 2008, no fish were tagged, and no tagged fish were reported. Volunteers made note of fry and/or juvenile fish in a total of 24 streams in 7 basins. Table 25. Number of adipose fin clips as reported by volunteer Salmon Watchers. Streams are listed in order of number of adipose-clipped fish reported. Stream Carey Creek Cedar River Cottage Lake Creek East Fork Issaquah Creek Issaquah Creek Kelsey Creek May Creek Mercer Slough Walsh Lake Diversion West Trib. Kelsey Creek chinook coho sockeye* unid. 5 3 10 7 3 2 3 9 7 1 1 0 1 2 5 1 Total 38 18 3 *See text for discussion about sockeye reported with adipose clips. 1 total 5 3 11 15 3 2 4 11 5 1 60 Chinook Salmon Chinook were observed in 5 basins in the study area during the 2008 surveys (Figure 14). A total of 171 live fish and 32 carcasses were found in 13 streams throughout the Lake Washington Watershed. Streams in which chinook were reported include (in order of most to least fish seen): Cottage Lake Creek (58), Big Bear Creek (25), West Trib. Kelsey Creek (21), Little Bear Creek (20), Cedar River (17), Mercer Slough (16), East Fork Issaquah Creek (12), Kelsey Creek (9), May Creek (8), North Creek (5), Richards Creek (5), Walsh Lake Diversion (4), and Issaquah Creek (3). Figure 14. Distribution of chinook salmon in the program area based on Salmon Watcher observations. See: http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/library/water-and-land/salmon/salmonwatcher/2008/figure14chinook-salmon-distribution-map.pdf. King County 29 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Sockeye Salmon Sockeye were by far the most numerous fish counted by volunteers. Sockeye were observed in 6 basins (Figure 15). A total of 1,556 live fish and 108 carcasses were observed in 14 streams and one Lake Washington beach (in order of most to least fish seen): Cedar River (708), North Creek (387), May Creek (344), Taylor Creek (61), Big Bear Creek (55), Little Bear Creek (28), Cottage Lake Creek (25), Walsh Lake Diversion (22), McAleer Creek (14), East Fork Issaquah Creek (9), Cedar River Side Channel at Dorre Don (3), Lake Washington Beach (3), Mercer Slough (3), John's Creek (1), and Rock Creek (1). “Residual sockeye” are those sockeye whose parents were sockeye, but during out-migration chose to remain in Lake Washington for some reason. When they return to their natal stream to spawn, they are smaller than normal ocean-going sockeye, and as such can be mistaken for kokanee. Four spawning seasons ago there was a near-record number of sockeye fry that were rearing in Lake Washington (Berge, H., pers. comm..). However, the ocean was not favorable for the fish that left the lake, and in 2008 the return of sockeye to Lake Washington was one of the worst on record. Sockeye that remained in Lake Washington fared much better than the ocean-migrants. Therefore, the absolute number of residual sockeye was much higher in 2008 than in other years. Professional fish biologists observed a large number of residual sockeye in North Creek and Little Bear Creek, as well as some in Bear Creek, Cottage Lake Creek, and May Creek. The kokanee reported in Little Bear Creek were in all likelihood actually residual sockeye (see Kokanee section below). A very low number of sockeye were observed in 2007 and 2008. The largest numbers of sockeye in the Lake Washington Watershed are typically in the Cedar River Basin and the Bear Creek Basin. Table 26 presents sockeye numbers observed by volunteers back through 1999. These numbers should be viewed with caution: they are only presented to provide a general comparison of what has been seen by volunteers in this program. The numbers are not useful for making statistically valid comparisons of returns or population trends, because too many variables are not controlled. Variable watching conditions notwithstanding, Cavanaugh Pond, along the Cedar River, is separated out in Table 26 because it has been watched consistently by the same volunteers since the Salmon Watcher Program began, and in both 2007 and 2008 those volunteers recorded an unmistakably lower number of sockeye at that location. Table 26. Number of sockeye observed in Bear Creek and Cedar River basins from 1999 to 2008. Bear Creek Basin fish Bear Creek Basin hours Bear Cr. Basin fish/hour Cedar River Basin fish Cedar River Basin hours Cedar River fish/hour Cavanaugh Pond fish/hour 1999 2000 269 4,559 126.1 112.1 2.1 40.7 3,952 12,713 139.2 257.0 28.4 49.5 50.0 167.5 2001 2002 1,837 10,625 178.9 227.4 10.3 46.7 7,827 13,254 270.2 266.4 29.0 49.8 29.1 84.8 2003 2004 2005 2006 441 278 507 3,007 162.3 140.7 97.9 108.3 2.7 2.0 5.2 27.8 5,675 5,298 3,734 4,381 208.4 310.7 300.9 295.1 27.2 17.1 12.4 14.8 37.9 28.8 13.7 16.8 2007 125 83.7 1.5 2,413 188.4 12.8 2.4 2008 214 76.7 2.8 840 176.4 4.8 2.2 Figure 15. Distribution of sockeye salmon in the program area based on Salmon Watcher observations See http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/library/water-and-land/salmon/salmonwatcher/2008/figure15sockeye-salmon-distribution-map.pdf. King County 30 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Coho Salmon Coho were observed in 5 Lake Washington Watershed basins and on Vashon (Figure 16). A total of 89 live coho and 10 carcasses were reported in 8 streams and at one Lake Washington beach in the Lake Washington Watershed and in 1 stream on Vashon (in order of most to least fish seen): Big Bear Creek (15), trib 070272 to Tuck Creek (15), Walsh Lake Diversion (13), East Fork Issaquah Creek (12), North Creek (12), Coal Creek (11), Carey Creek (10), May Creek (6), Judd Creek (2), Lake Washington Beach (2), and Cottage Lake Creek (1). Figure 16. Distribution of coho salmon in the program area based on Salmon Watcher observations. See http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/library/water-and-land/salmon/salmonwatcher/2008/figure16-cohosalmon-distribution-map.pdf. Kokanee Kokanee were observed in 2 basins (Figure 17). A total of 154 live fish and 2 carcasses were counted in 2 streams: Little Bear Creek (136) and Lewis Creek (20). 2008 saw a large number of residual sockeye in some of the creeks in the Sammamish River Tributaries (see Sockeye section above). Professional fish biologists who surveyed these streams found kokanee only in the Sammamish River. It is very likely that many or all of the fish that were reported as kokanee in Little Bear Creek were actually residual sockeye. Figure 17. Distribution of kokanee in the program area based on Salmon Watcher observations. See http://your.kingcounty.gov/dnrp/library/water-and-land/salmon/salmonwatcher/2008/figure17kokanee-distribution-map.pdf. Chum Chum were observed in very low numbers in 2 streams. In Pipers Creek, 25 live and 1 dead chum were reported. A single coho carcass was reported in Fisher Creek on Vashon. Trout and Unidentified Species Twenty live and 1 dead trout were reported in 5 creeks in the Lake Washington Watershed in 2008. Fish of unidentified species were observed in 19 streams and 1 Lake Washington Beach in 7 basins in the Lake Washington Watershed including WRIA 8 Puget Sound streams: 88 live fish and 11 carcasses were unidentifiable. Additionally, 2 unidentified dead fish were observed in Judd Creek on Vashon. King County 31 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report References Berge, H., Ecologist, King County Water and Land Resources Division, Department of Natural Resources and Parks, Seattle, WA. 2008. Personal communication. King County. 2004. 2003 Volunteer Salmon Watcher Program: Lake Washington Watershed and Vashon Island. 48pp. {Vanderhoof author} Vanderhoof, J. 2001. 2000 volunteer salmon watcher program in the Lake Washington Watershed. King County Department of Natural Resources, Seattle, WA. Williams, R.W., R.M. Laramie, and J.J. Ames. 1975. A Catalog of Washington Streams and Salmon Utilization, Volume 1, Puget Sound. Washington Department of Fisheries, Olympia, WA. King County 32 2008 Salmon Watcher Program Report Appendix A Data Collection Form used in 2008 King County A-1 Appendix A Data form looks like this: King County A-1 Appendix A Appendix B Fauntleroy Creek Salmon Watch 2008 Summary King County B-1 Appendix B This page left intentionally blank. King County B-1 Appendix B 2008 FAUNTLEROY SALMON WATCH6 From the Fauntleroy Community Association We closed Salmon Watch 2008 November 24 with a grand total of one coho spawner, who appeared on Nov. 8 in the fish ladder and waited in vain for a mate. During this return season, fishers reported seeing a few coho in the cove but also sea lions and seals, plus tribal purse seiners along the West Seattle peninsula. Creek conditions were excellent (at least .7' of water at the gauge), and rains were periodic and generous. Our watch ran Oct. 27 to Nov. 24 and involved 16 volunteers. They recorded some 35 visitors at the fish-ladder viewpoint or creekside. -Judy Pickens 6 Fauntleroy Creek is located in Seattle in the Central Puget Sound basin of WRIA 9. The results of their annual survey are included here as an appendix to the Salmon Watcher report as a way to further share information collected by other volunteer salmon watching groups in the region. King County B-1 Appendix B ...
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