P1905-0150.doc - 1 History and memory based on survivor...

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1 History and memory based on survivor testimony and academic resource at Jewish Holocaust Centre
2 The common narrative of the impact of history lies with how easy people can recall the incident. Most of the memorial sites would always furnish the indexical link to the past traumatic events said to have precisely taken place within given period of time. Such memorials give a true definition of the trauma sites. One such experience resides with my visit to the Jewish Holocaust Museum founded in Elstenrwick, Melbourne in the year 1984 by the Holocaust survivors in Australia. The prime mission of the centre was to commemorate the 6 million Jews who were murdered by the Nazis as from the year 1933 to the year 1945. Over 21000 students would visit the museum on annual basis and take part in the most powerful education program. My visit to this centre gave me an opportunity of interacting with original materials that included photographs, documents, craftwork, textiles as well as precious objects. The most important side of my experience entailed hearing the survivor testimony and reading the books authored by the local survivors. Based on this, the discussion fosters the demonstration of the clear relationship between history and the memory based on the survivor testimony as well as the academic sources. This equally means looking at the implications of the site in representing collective and individual memory, how the site represents trauma and the relationship between history and trauma. One of the dimensional look at the JHC Library and survivor testimony revolves around the collective and individual memory, and how the two look different or similar. The lens of individual memory fosters the personal interpretation of an event. In most cases, the entire term “individual” essentially imply the personal outlook which contributes to the memory formation. On the other hand, collective memories are largely constructed socially on the basis of the common sentiments, present circumstances and vales. Both the individual and collective memory shaped by JHC depends on the personal accounts, survivor testimony and even academic sources 1 . However, JHC gives narrowed lanes of individual memories, which would largely focus on personal experiences rather than thematic or wide encounters that touched on the life of every survivor. A relook at the daily life in Lodz Ghetto leads to realization of the Holocaust survivors such as Tola Walach Melzer and Shimon Srebrnik. Srebrnik narrates 1 Greenspan, Henry, Sara R. Horowitz, Éva Kovács, Berel Lang, Dori Laub, Kenneth Waltzer, and Annette Wieviorka. "Engaging survivors: Assessing ‘testimony’and ‘trauma’as foundational concepts." Dapim: Studies on the Holocaust 28, no. 3 (2014): 190- 226.
3 “We got a loaf of bread for eight days….but people finished it in two days and then what? .... I walked around with a stick with a nail stuck on the end. A truck with potatoes passed outside the Ghetto, I ran after the truck and caught the potatoes with my stick. We were thieves… we had to

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