manageacasualtyCombatFatigue

manageacasualtyCombatFatigue - Combat Life Saver Lesson 24...

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Combat Life Saver Lesson 24 MANAGE A CASUALTY WITH COMBAT STRESS REACTION (BATTLE FATIGUE) Compiled and edited by, 2LT John C. Miller, PA-C
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Lesson 24 MANAGE A CASUALTY WITH COMBAT STRESS REACTION (BATTLE FATIGUE) INTRODUCTION Not all casualties have bleeding wounds, broken bones, or chemical agent poisoning. Some casualties suffer psychological injuries, commonly referred to as combat stress reaction, but since World War II it has also been called battle fatigue. Most combat stress casualties can be treated without evacuating them out of the combat zone. Sometimes the treatment is simply making sure the soldier gets a good night's rest, warm food, and a change of clothing.
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MANAGE A CASUALTY WITH COMBAT STRESS REACTION (BATTLE FATIGUE) INTRODUCTION (cont) Combat stress can be mild to severe. Mild cases do not seriously interfere with the soldier's effectiveness. If the combat stress is moderate to severe, the soldier is ineffective and usually requires evacuation. Moderate and severe combat stress reactions are sometimes referred to as "more serious" combat stress.
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MANAGE A CASUALTY WITH COMBAT STRESS REACTION (BATTLE FATIGUE) TASK Identify characteristics of combat stress reaction and its treatment. CONDITIONS Given written items pertaining to the identification and treatment of combat stress reaction. STANDARD Score 70 or more points on the 100-point written examination.
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Some of the problems which contribute to the development of combat stress are: Physical exhaustion. Constant alertness. Loss of sleep. Trauma of seeing fellow soldiers wounded or killed. Fear of being killed or maimed. Fear of killing other people. Fear of failure or disgrace.
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This note was uploaded on 01/11/2012 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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manageacasualtyCombatFatigue - Combat Life Saver Lesson 24...

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