GastrAnatPhysiol

GastrAnatPhysiol - GastricAnatomy&Physiology Anatomy...

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Gastric Anatomy & Physiology
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Anatomy In adult life, stomach located T10 and  L3 vertebral segment Can be divided into anatomic regions  based on external landmarks 4 regions Cardia Fundus Corpus (body) Antrum
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Anatomy Cardia- region just  distal to the GE  junction Fundus- portion  above and to the left  of the GE junction
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Anatomy Corpus- region between  fundus and antrum Margin not distinctly  external, has arbitrary  borders Antrum- bounded  distally by the pylorus Which can be  appreciated by palpation  of a thickened ring of  smooth muscle
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Anatomy   Position of the  stomach varies with  body habitus In general- it is fixed  at two points Proximally at the GE  juction Distally by the  retroperitoneal  duodenum
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Anatomy Anterior- in contact with Left  hemi-diaphragm, left lobe and  anterior segment of right lobe of  the liver and the anterior parietal  surface of the abdominal wall Posterior- Left diaphragm, Left  kidney, Left adrenal gland, and  neck, tail and body of pancreas The greater curvature is near  the transverse colon and  transverse colon mesentery The concavity of the spleen  contacts the left lateral portion  of the stomach
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Vasculature
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Vasculature Well vascularized organ Arterial flow mainly derived from Celiac Artery 3 Branches Left Gastric Artery Supplies the cardia of the stomach and distal esophagus Splenic Artery Gives rise to 2 branches which help supply the greater curvature  of the stomach  Left Gastroepiploic Short Gastric Arteries Common Hepatic or Proper Hepatic Artery 2 major branches Right Gastric- supples a portion of the lesser curvature Gastroduodenal artery -Gives rise to Right Gastroepiploic artery          -helps supply greater curvature in conjunction            with Left Gastroepiploic Artery 
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Anatomy Venous Drainage Parallels arterial supply Lymphatic drainage Lymph from the proximal portion of the stomach drains along the lesser  curvature first drains into superior gastric lymph nodes surrounding the Left  Gastric Artery Distal portion of lesser curvature drains through the suprapyloric nodes Proximal portion of the greater curvature is supplied by the lymphatic  vessels that traverse the pancreaticosplenic nodes Antral portion of the greater curvature drains into the subpyloric and omental  nodal groups In general- The lymphatic drainage of the human stomach, like its blood  supply, exhibits extensive intramural ramifications and a number of  extramural communications.  Therefore spread beyond is often beyond  region of origin at a distance from the primary lymphatic zone
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Anatomy Nerve Supply Left and Right Vagus Nerves descend  parallel to the esophagus within the thorax 
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This note was uploaded on 01/12/2012 for the course STEP 1 taught by Professor Dr.aslam during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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GastrAnatPhysiol - GastricAnatomy&Physiology Anatomy...

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