Information Extraction Technique

Information Extraction Technique - Information Extraction...

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Information Extraction Technique This document describes the instructions for using the Information Extraction Technique. The document is divided into 5 main sections: 1) An introduction to the technique 2) A glossary where the key terms are defined in this context 3) A procedure of steps that describes clearly WHAT you have to do. 4) A set of guidelines, i.e. heuristics to keep in mind as you do the above procedure. 5) A set of data entry forms 1) Introduction The Information Extraction Technique is a structured reading method for extracting information from papers, which can later be analyzed to explore the evidence that supports various hypotheses. In this assignment, you will follow the procedure for identifying and recording hypotheses from papers in the scientific literature. The procedure focuses the search specifically on hypotheses and context descriptions, providing some guidelines to help recognize and abstract them. 2) Glossary Hypothesis A hypothesis is a tentative explanation for certain behaviors, phenomena, or events that have occurred or will occur. A good hypothesis states as clearly and concisely as possible the expected relationship (or difference) between two or more variables and defines those variables in operational, measurable terms. Any hypothesis should be stated in such a way that data can be collected that either supports or refutes the hypothesis. For the purpose of our analysis, we classify hypotheses as tested or untested: a) Tested Hypothesis A tested hypothesis is a tentative explanation for certain behaviors, phenomena, or events that have occurred in experience or empirical study. b) Untested Hypothesis (Belief) An untested hypothesis (otherwise called a belief or assumption) is a tentative explanation for certain behaviors, phenomena, or events without explicit reference to empirical data. 3) Procedure 1) Read the paper, keeping in mind the two kinds of information that you want to identify: a. Hypotheses (tested and untested), and b. Context descriptions 2) When you find relevant information during your reading, highlight it so that there can be some traceability back to the original source if questions arise later. 3)
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Information Extraction Technique - Information Extraction...

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