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szeliski94image - Image Mosaicing for Tele-Reality...

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Image Mosaicing for Tele-Reality Applications Richard Szeliski Digital Equipment Corporation Cambridge Research Lab CRL 94/2 May, 1994
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Digital Equipment Corporation has four research facilities: the Systems Research Center and the Western Research Laboratory, both in Palo Alto, California; the Paris Research Laboratory, in Paris; and the Cambridge Research Laboratory, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Cambridge laboratory became operational in 1988 and is located at One Kendall Square, near MIT. CRL engages in computing research to extend the state of the computing art in areas likely to be important to Digital and its customers in future years. CRL’s main focus is applications technology; that is, the creation of knowledge and tools useful for the preparation of important classes of applications. CRL Technical Reports can be ordered by electronic mail. To receive instructions, send a mes- sage to one of the following addresses, with the word help in the Subject line: On Digital’s EASYnet: CRL::TECHREPORTS On the Internet: techreports@crl.dec.com This work may not be copied or reproduced for any commercial purpose. Permission to copy without payment is granted for non-profit educational and research purposes provided all such copies include a notice that such copy- ing is by permission of the Cambridge Research Lab of Digital Equipment Corporation, an acknowledgment of the authors to the work, and all applicable portions of the copyright notice. The Digital logo is a trademark of Digital Equipment Corporation. Cambridge Research Laboratory One Kendall Square Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 TM
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Image Mosaicing for Tele-Reality Applications Richard Szeliski Digital Equipment Corporation Cambridge Research Lab CRL 94/2 May, 1994 Abstract While a large number of virtual reality applications, such as fluid flow analysis and molecular modeling, deal with simulated data, many newer applications attempt to recreate true reality as convincingly as possible. Building detailed models for such applications, which we call tele-reality , is a major bottleneck holding back their deployment. In this paper, we present techniques for automatically deriving realistic 2-D scenes and 3-D texture-mapped models from video sequences, which can help overcome this bottleneck. The fundamental technique we use is image mosaicing , i.e., the automatic alignment of multiple images into larger aggregates which are then used to represent portions of a 3-D scene. We begin with the easiest problems, those of flat scene and panoramic scene mosaicing, and progress to more complicated scenes, culminating in full 3-D models. We also present a number of novel applications based on tele-reality technology. Keywords:
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This note was uploaded on 01/12/2012 for the course CMSC 733 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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szeliski94image - Image Mosaicing for Tele-Reality...

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