610-01 - ECO610401 Monday,September8 CourseOutline Readings Brickleyet.al,Chapters12,4:96114 Hoyt,Lectures1:110 NextClass(Monday,September15

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ECO 610-401 Monday, September 8 – Course Outline – Review of Supply and Demand – Readings: • Brickley et. al, Chapters 1-2,4:96-114;  • Hoyt, Lectures 1:1-10 Next Class (Monday, September 15) • Demand and Supply; Market Equilibrium  (continued); • Pricing with Market Power  • Readings –Brickley et. al, Chapters 4 & 7; –Hoyt, Lectures 1:11-16-2:1-6 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Course Description From the  University Bulletin 2001-2002  (p. 216) "Analysis  of applications of economic theory to management  decision making.  Such problems as demand and cost  determination, pricing, and capital budgeting are treated." Narrow goal: Using the tools of economics, a number of  business practices and strategies including pricing, cost  determination, compensation, entry and exit, and output  decisions.   Broader goal: Acquaint the student with and help the  student learn to use economic analysis in his or her  professional, business pursuits.  
Background image of page 2
Use of Tools of Economic Analysis Most of you have been exposed to the use of graphical analysis in economics.  Some of you might also have taken courses in which calculus and algebraic equations  have been used extensively.  In this course, some graphical analysis is used as are algebra and calculus but much less  than most intermediate economics courses.  My view: very unlikely that most of you will ever use these tools (graphs and calculus) to  solve any problems you face in business, there is not a good reason to train you  extensively in their use.  Use graphical analysis and algebra examples only when I think they add to your  understanding of an economic concept or principal.  Use numerical examples and cases as an opportunity to see how an economic principal or  tool can be applied to business decision-making.  Exams and assignments will also be much more heavily weighted towards solving simple  numerical examples or analyzing actual or hypothetical cases.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Reading   and Text The required text for the course is: – Brickley, James; Smith, Clifford; and Zimmerman, Jerold Managerial Economics and Organizational Architecture , McGraw  Hill – Irwin, 2007, 4th Edition. Additionally chapters from: Hoyt, William H.  Lectures in Managerial Economics , 2008. Lectures in Managerial Economics  is an unpublished manuscript that  will be available (by lecture) at the website.  • Material used in a number of sections of the course and  complements the material in your text.  • Not a substitute for the lecture nor are they a verbatim summary  of the lecture.   Do not use them as a substitute for class or taking notes in  class. 
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/13/2012 for the course ECONOMICS 610 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Gateway Tech.

Page1 / 40

610-01 - ECO610401 Monday,September8 CourseOutline Readings Brickleyet.al,Chapters12,4:96114 Hoyt,Lectures1:110 NextClass(Monday,September15

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online