Feminism - Feminism History and Literature History Three...

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Feminism History and Literature
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History “Three Waves” of Feminism 19th through early 20th centuries 1960s-1980s 1990’s-Present First Wave: First-wave feminism refers to a period of feminist activity during the nineteenth century and early twentieth century. It focused primarily on gaining the right of women's suffrage. The term, "first-wave," was coined retrospectively after the term second- wave feminism began to be used to describe a newer feminist movement that focused as much on fighting social and cultural inequalities as further political inequalities.
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The Seneca Falls Convention , July 19–20, 1848 Held in Seneca Falls, New York over two days. The convention was seen by some of its contemporaries, including organizer and featured speaker Lucretia Mott, as but a single step in the continuing effort by women to gain for themselves a greater proportion of social, civil and moral rights, but it was viewed by others as a revolutionary beginning to the struggle by women for complete equality with men. Afterward, Elizabeth Cady Stanton presented the resulting Declaration of Sentiments as a foundational document in the American woman's suffrage movement, and she promoted the event as being the first time that women and men gathered together to demand for women the right to vote. Stanton's authoring of the History of Woman Suffrage helped to establish the Seneca Falls Convention as the moment when the push for women's suffrage first gained national prominence. By 1851, at the second National Women's Rights Convention in Worcester, Massachusetts, the issue of women's right to vote had become a central tenet of the women's rights movement
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History Frances Willard and the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union Although still unable to vote in the late nineteenth century, women were far from apolitical; the WCTU demonstrated the breadth of women's political activity in the late nineteenth century. Frances Willard radically changed the direction of the WCTU, moving it away from religiously oriented programs to a campaign that stressed alcoholism as a disease rather than a sin and poverty as a cause rather than a result of drink. In a shrewd political tactic, Willard capitalized on the cult of domesticity to move women into public life and gain power to ameliorate social problems. Using the concept of “home protection,” Willard worked to create a broad reform coalition in the 1890s, embracing the Knights of Labor, the People's Party, and the Prohibition Party. The WCTU, which had over 200,000 members in the 1890s, gave women valuable experience in political action.
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History Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and the Movement for Woman Suffrage Unlike the WCTU, the organized movement for woman suffrage remained small and relatively weak in the late nineteenth century.
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