Lab 3 Biogeography - Group Name Members present Lab 3 Convergent Evolution and Biogeography at the UCR Botanic Gardens(adapted from Lab 9

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Group Name: Members present: Lab 3: Convergent Evolution and Biogeography at the UCR Botanic Gardens (adapted from Lab 9 Biogeography at the Botanic Gardens by Michael Fugate, PhD at UCR) Figure 1: Subtropical Regions of the world from Troll and Paffen (Wikipedia Commons) The subtropics are geographical regions just north and south of the tropical region boundaries (Tropics of Capricorn and Cancer). As a climatic zone defined by temperature alone, subtropical regions occur between 20° and 40° latitude N and S of the equator. Though descriptions vary, the mean temperature for subtropical regions is above 10°C (50°F) for at least 8 months of the year with coldest winter temperatures that average slightly above freezing (Figure 1). As you can see in Figure 1, the Botanic Gardens of UCR (as well as Riverside) are located within this temperature zone. Though the temperature patterns are very similar in each of the regions shown above, precipitation patterns can vary dramatically. As a result, subtropical regions are host to a wide variety of biomes from dry deserts and savannahs to humid and monsoon forests. Given the valley like location and surrounding hills of the UCR Botanic Gardens, a great diversity of microclimates exists within the 40 acre museum. By studying Figure 1 above, you can see the regions of the world that are represented by plants at the gardens. 1. How are all the regions outlined in Figure 1 similar? How do they differ? 2. Why do you think the Botanic Gardens can grow 3,500 different plant species from all over the world? 3. Why aren’t any of the plants at the garden tropical rainforest plants? What would the garden need to supply in order to grow such plants?
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Biogeography is the study of the distribution of biodiversity across the earth. Biogeography attempts to describe which species live in a certain area and explain why they live there. (A.R. Wallace, who co- authored Darwin’s first paper on natural selection, helped develop biogeography theory. His descriptions of the distributions of the Malay Peninsula led him independently to the same ideas about evolution as Darwin.) Two major hypotheses of biogeography explain why an organism is found in a particular area: 1) one of its ancestors speciated there = historical explanation; or 2) it dispersed there
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This note was uploaded on 01/13/2012 for the course BIO 8 taught by Professor Prestongalusky during the Fall '11 term at Riverside Community College.

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Lab 3 Biogeography - Group Name Members present Lab 3 Convergent Evolution and Biogeography at the UCR Botanic Gardens(adapted from Lab 9

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