Aristotle RhetoricNotes

Aristotle RhetoricNotes - Aristotles View of Rhetoric...

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Aristotle’s View of Rhetoric Aristotle takes his orientation from the biological world and applies that perspective to the physical and social world. Aristotle said there are 3 kinds of arts: Theoria The physical and natural sciences where the subject matter is fixed and final. Here Truth can be found. Praxis The doings of people The subject matter is contingent. The inquirer is not full separated from the subject of study, and there is a moral dimension. Poeisis. Making things including poetry, histories, sculptures, paintings. Rhetoric in within the arts of Praxis. Aristotle’s definition of rhetoric: “The faculty of discovering in any given case the available means of persuasion.” (Rhetoric, 1355) Aristotle begins his book rhetoric with a defense of the subject. 1. Persons should be able to state their position and defend themselves with words. That is what fee people do. 2. If the audience is mislead by bad arguments that is the fault of poor rhetorical training. Well trained orators should:
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Aristotle RhetoricNotes - Aristotles View of Rhetoric...

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