3 Attitudes - Attitudes June 6 2011 Professor Jamie Gorman...

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Attitudes June 6, 2011 Professor Jamie Gorman Doctoral Candidate Rutgers University at Newark Smith Hall Room 113 [email protected]
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Why People Seek Self- Knowledge Knowing your capabilities might dictate your behavior fighting back or backing down Self-knowledge helps you fit in with others **Appraisal Motive Looking for the truth about oneself **Self-Enhancement Motive Looking for flattering things about self **Consistency Motive Looking for confirmation about current belief about self An interesting prediction of the consistency motive is that those who hold negative views of themselves may resist information to the contrary.
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When Motives Compete Self-Enhancement Motive Strongest motive (emotional appeal) Automatic egotism – response by automatic system that “everything good is me, and everything bad is not me” Consistency Motive Second preference (cognitive appeal) Appraisal Motive Weakest motive Requires conscious override of egotism
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Self-Serving Biases Attributions Deciding who or what is responsible for a particular outcome Can be influenced by a number of factors
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Self-Serving Biases (continued) Self-serving attribution We make positive attributions that allow us to see ourselves in the best possible light We make external attributions for negative outcomes We make internal attributions for positive outcomes In other words, we take credit for success but we don’t take responsibility for failure
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False Consensus Our tendency to overestimate the number of people who act or think as we do May serve a self-protective function May be reinforced by the company we keep
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Unrealistic Optimism The tendency to imagine that our own outcomes are better than those of other people Positives May be indicative of better self-efficacy May help speed recovery from setbacks Negatives Can lead us to under prepare for negative occurrences
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Self-Knowledge and the Duplex Mind Automatic Egotism response by the automatic system that “everything good is me, and everything bad is not me” Automatic, self-enhancing Modesty Conscious, deliberate control
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Looking At Others Social Comparison – assigns value to inner traits Upward social comparisons – comparing yourself to people better than you Can motivate you to do better Downward social comparisons – comparing against people worse off than yourself Can make you feel good
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We use others as the standard by which we compare ourselves Downward social comparison We can enhance our self-esteem by feeling that we are better than other people Have you ever felt better about your romantic relationship when that of a friend fell apart? Have you ever felt better about your "A" on an exam,
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This note was uploaded on 01/11/2012 for the course PSYCH 21:830:335 taught by Professor Jamiegordon during the Summer '11 term at Rutgers.

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3 Attitudes - Attitudes June 6 2011 Professor Jamie Gorman...

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