5 Social Perception

5 Social Perception - Social Perception Professor Jamie...

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Social Perception June 14, 2011 Professor Jamie Gorman Doctoral Candidate Rutgers University at Newark Smith Hall Room 113 [email protected]
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Social Psychology The exploration of the interaction of an individual person and a given situation Three main areas of interest: Social perception Social influence Social interaction
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Attributing Behavior to Persons or to Situations Attribution Theory: Humans tend to explain the behavior of others by appealing either to the situation or the person’s inherent personality. Fritz Heider
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Attribution Theory Dispositional attribution: Explaining behavior in terms of personality. Internal attribution Situational attribution: Explaining behavior in terms of the situation. External attribution How we interpret behavior influences how we react. Is this girl depressed, or  has she just had a fight  with a friend?
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To What do We Attribute People’s Behaviors? Dispositional attributions Assuming that the cause of an action is due to a person’s internal characteristics Situational attributions Assuming that the cause of an action is due to external/environmental factors
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Stability of Attributions Internal External Stable Ability Task Difficulty Unstable Effort Luck
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Correspondent Inference Theory We make attributions for others’ actions based on three factors Was the behavior freely chosen? Is the behavior expected in a context? What are the action’s consequences?
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Covariation Theory Also bases attributions on three factors Consensus – would most people behave in the same way? Distinctiveness – would the same person behave differently in other situations? Consistency – does the individual respond in the same way to the same stimulus in different contexts?
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Decision Making in Covariation Theory
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Attribution Cube and Excuses Excuses Raise consensus – it happens to everyone Lower consistency – it doesn’t usually happen to me Raise distinctiveness – it doesn’t usually happen in other situations
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Attributions are based on assumptions, and often on
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5 Social Perception - Social Perception Professor Jamie...

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