7 Persuasion - Persuasion June 16, 2011 Professor Jamie...

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Persuasion June 16, 2011 Professor Jamie Gorman Doctoral Candidate Rutgers University at Newark Smith Hall Room 113 Gormanj@psychology.rutgers.edu
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What are Persuasive Messages? (continued) Central route processing creates opinions that are resistant to change People rely on the message and their own reflections More cognitive effort makes more entrenched positions The Elaboration Likelihood Model (ELM) Petty and Cacioppo (1986) Attempts to explain which processing route we are likely to take
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Which Way to Spring Break
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What Influences which Route We Take? The source The person or organization who delivers a persuasive message Attractive = more persuasive (with limits) Credibility = can increase or decrease persuasive ability The sleeper effect – the persuasive impact of a non-credible source actually increases over time!
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What Influences which Route We Take? (continued) The source The person or organization who delivers a persuasive message Similarity between the source and the audience Background Values Association Level of attractiveness Likeability – if we don’t find the source likeable, it will be hard for that source to persuade us of anything!
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What Influences which Route We Take? (continued) The message - two main components Message content The tactics used to communicate a concept Message constructions How the message is put together (data, length, repetition) The valence of a message The attraction or aversion a person feels toward an object, event, or idea Can be a positive or negative valence
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What Influences which Route We Take? (continued) The message - two main components Fear-based appeals Negative valence that is elicited by a message designed to prevent a specific action Most effective when trying to prevent a negative outcome Strong fear might cause defensive reactions
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Some public service announcements (PSAs) use fear-based approaches in an attempt to persuade the public to avoid certain unhealthy behaviors.
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The Social Side of Sex - Scared into Safe Sex? Effect of fear inspiring anti-AIDs films Fear-inducing message was rejected by sexually active college students Instilling fear is unreliable mode of influence People resist feeling bad
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What Influences which Route We Take? (continued) Positive valence can be more effective than fear-based
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7 Persuasion - Persuasion June 16, 2011 Professor Jamie...

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