aggression - Aggression June 30, 2011 Professor Jamie...

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Aggression June 30, 2011 Professor Jamie Gorman Doctoral Candidate Rutgers University at Newark Smith Hall Room 113 [email protected]
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Defining Antisocial Behavior Antisocial Behavior Behavior that either damages interpersonal relationships or is culturally undesirable. Aggression may be social or antisocial Behaviors in addition to aggression may be antisocial
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What is the Nature of Aggression? Aggression is behavior that intends to harm another individual Can be either verbal or physical actions Is sometimes used to release frustration or address conflict Hostile aggression – the goal is suffering for the victim Instrumental aggression – the goal is "non-injurious" but the acts serve a different purpose
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Armed robbery is a form of instrumental aggression, as the primary goal is obtain money, not to harm another.
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Aggression Aggression:  any physical or verbal behavior intended  to harm another person who is motivated to avoid  harm.  Reactive hostility  against perceived aggression or  proactive hostility  calculated means to an end. Aggressive behavior emerges from the interaction of  biology and experience.
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Displaced Aggression Displaced aggression – attacking a different or innocent target rather than the original source of the anger Kicking the dog effect Triggered displaced aggression Minor triggering event increases aggression in angered participants
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Age and Aggression 25% of toddler interactions in day-care settings involve physical aggression Limited alternatives for solving conflict due to limited cognitive capacities But at least they’re too small to do real damage Good reason why guns and weapons must be strictly guarded around children!
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Gender Differences Males tend more toward hostile aggression than females Females tend more toward relational aggression than males Males are also more often the victims of aggression
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Gender and Aggression When under stress Males – fight or flight syndrome Females – tend and befriend syndrome In all known societies – men just over age of puberty commit most violent crimes and acts Females exhibit more relational aggression
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Gender Differences (continued) The research shows, however, overall differences in "aggression" are not that big (including all forms of aggression) Provocation is a big factor
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Gender Differences (continued) The type of aggression affects gender differences Direct – clearly derived from aggressor, aimed at victim Indirect – not clearly derived from aggressor, victim is unclear Expressive view of aggression – aggression is used to express anger and reduce stress
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Types of Aggression. Aggression can be a combination of direct, indirect, verbal, and physical behavior.
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Types of Aggression Hostile aggression Hot, impulsive Instrumental aggression Cold, premeditated Passive aggression - harming others by
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This note was uploaded on 01/11/2012 for the course PSYCH 21:830:335 taught by Professor Jamiegordon during the Summer '11 term at Rutgers.

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aggression - Aggression June 30, 2011 Professor Jamie...

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