Prosocial Behavior

Prosocial Behavior - Groups Professor Jamie Gorman Doctoral Candidate Rutgers University at Newark Smith Hall Room 113

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Unformatted text preview: Groups Professor Jamie Gorman Doctoral Candidate Rutgers University at Newark Smith Hall Room 113 Gormanj@psychology.rutgers.edu Why do We Help? • Prosocial behavior – positive social actions intended to help others – Egoistic model – when behaviors are done for selfish reasons – Altruistic model – when behaviors are done for selfless reasons Why do We Help? (continued) • Moral cleansing – engaging in actions that are meant to restore a sense of order – Neurobiological explanation – the mesolimbic reward system is activated when we give or receive rewards Why do We Help? (continued) • Egoistic models – Negative state relief model • We provide help to relieve our own negative reaction to thinking another’s pain • Empathy – Having compassion for another – Seeing the world through another’s eyes Why do We Help? (continued) – Cost-benefit analysis • We are more inclined to help others when it will help us as well • We weigh others’ needs with our own. If helping "costs" too much, we won’t. – This includes not only our effort, but also potential negative consequences – Further, we consider the type of rewards we may achieve by helping • Mood is also important – those in a good mood are more likely to help Why do we engage in actions that will benefit others? People sometimes help others for their own gain, such as when people do internships. Doing the work for free benefits the employer but also provides benefits to the student, such as increased skill and experience as well as a reference. Altruistic Models of Helping • Empathy-altruism model of prosocial behavior – We are more likely to help others’ whose welfare is threatened – This can occur even when there are great costs to the helping person – Some argue that there is no "true" self-less help, while others contend that this can occur People will help those in need if they feel nurturing feelings toward them, even in the absence of any selfish motivations. Norms • Two social "rules" for when people behave in prosocial ways – Injunctive norms • Specify what most approve or disapprove of – Descriptive norms • Specify what most people do • Reciprocity norm – We help others who have helped us...
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This note was uploaded on 01/11/2012 for the course PSYCH 21:830:335 taught by Professor Jamiegordon during the Summer '11 term at Rutgers.

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Prosocial Behavior - Groups Professor Jamie Gorman Doctoral Candidate Rutgers University at Newark Smith Hall Room 113

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