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Acid_Nomenclature - –ic or –ous The suffix –ic is...

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Rules for Naming Acids NOTE: For this course, you should know the ones with an asterisk (*) after the name. . 1. If the anion of the acid does not contain oxygen, the acid is named with the prefix hydro- and the suffix -ic , attached to the root name of the element or polyatomic ion. This is then followed by the word acid . For example: HCl(aq) hydrochloric acid* HF(aq) hydrofluoric acid* HBr(aq) hydrobromic acid* HI(aq) hydroiodic acid* HCN(aq) hydrocyanic acid H 2 S(aq) hydrosulfuric acid It is important to note that these compounds are considered to be acids only when in aqueous solution (i.e., dissolved in water). In their pure form, they are named using the regular rules (for example, HCl(g) is hydrogen chloride, HCN(g) is hydrogen cyanide, etc.) 2. If the anion contains oxygen, the acid name is formed from the root name of the central element of the anion, with a suffix
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Unformatted text preview: –ic or –ous . The suffix –ic is used when the anion name ends in –ate , and -ous is used when the anion name ends in –ite . These are usually named as acids whether or not they are in aqueous solution. Common examples: Acid Anion Name HNO 3 NO 3-(nitrate) nitric acid* H 2 SO 4 SO 4 2-(sulfate) sulfuric acid* H 3 PO 4 PO 4 2-(phosphate) phosphoric acid* HC 2 H 3 O 2 C 2 H 3 O 2-(acetate) acetic acid* H 3 C 6 H 5 O 7 C 6 H 5 O 7 3-(citrate) citric acid HNO 2 NO 2-(nitrite) nitrous acid H 2 SO 3 SO 3 2-(sulfite) sulfurous acid Using this rule, the chlorine (and other halogen) oxyanion acids can also be named: HClO ClO-(hypochlorite) hypochlorous acid HClO 2 ClO 2-(chlorite) chlorous acid HClO 3 ClO 3-(chlorate) chloric acid HClO 4 ClO 4-(perchlorate) perchloric acid...
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