7.7 Notes - 16 1 2 1 dx x How can we extend this to...

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Calculus II Section 7.7 – Improper Integrals Recall that the definition of the definite integral b a dx x f ) ( requires that [a,b] be finite. Also, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus requires that f be continuous on [a,b]. Now we are going to learn to evaluate integrals where these conditions are not met (i.e., Improper Integrals). First, consider the integral 1 2 1 dx x . If we extend our idea of definite integrals it makes sense that we would get the area indicated below. Does it seem that this area will always be infinite? We will come back to that question later. Now we will evaluate the integral. We know how to evaluate the integrals given below. 4 1 2 1 dx x 8 1 2 1 dx x 12 1 2 1 dx x
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Unformatted text preview: 16 1 2 1 dx x How can we extend this to evaluate 1 2 1 dx x ? You guessed it! We will take the limit as the upper limit of integration approaches infinity. That is, = b b dx x dx x 1 2 1 2 1 lim 1 . Evaluate: 1 2 1 dx x Now evaluate 1 1 dx x What makes the difference in the value of the integral? Now evaluate -+ dx e e x x 2 1 The second type of improper integral is the type where there is a point of discontinuity in the interval [a,b]. The discontinuity could occur at either an endpoint or at a point inside the interval. Example: e dx x 2 ln Now evaluate -1 1 2 1 dx x...
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This note was uploaded on 01/13/2012 for the course MATH 2564 taught by Professor Pamelasatterfield during the Spring '12 term at NorthWest Arkansas Community College.

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7.7 Notes - 16 1 2 1 dx x How can we extend this to...

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