1994 Campbell Abridged

1994 Campbell - 1 LUTHER R CAMPBELL v ACUFF-ROSE MUSIC INC 510 U.S 569(1994 JUSTICE SOUTER delivered the opinion of the Court We are called upon to

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Unformatted text preview: 1 LUTHER R. CAMPBELL v. ACUFF-ROSE MUSIC, INC. 510 U.S. 569 (1994) JUSTICE SOUTER delivered the opinion of the Court. We are called upon to decide whether 2 Live Crew's commercial parody of Roy Orbison's song, "Oh, Pretty Woman," [*572] may be a fair use within the meaning of the Copyright Act of 1976, 17 U.S.C. § 107. Although the District Court granted summary judgment for 2 Live Crew, the Court of Appeals reversed, holding the defense of fair use barred by the song's commercial character and ex- cessive borrowing. Because we hold that a parody's commercial character is only one element to be weighed in a fair use enquiry, and that insufficient consideration was given to the nature of parody in weighing the degree of copying, we reverse and remand. I In 1964, Roy Orbison and William Dees wrote a rock ballad called "Oh, Pretty Woman" and as- signed their rights in it to respondent Acuff-Rose Music, Inc. Acuff-Rose registered the song for copyright protection. Petitioners Luther R. Campbell, Christopher Wongwon, Mark Ross, and David Hobbs are col- lectively known as 2 Live Crew, a popular rap music group. 1 In 1989, Campbell wrote a song enti- tled "Pretty Woman," which he later described in an affidavit as intended, "through comical lyrics, to satirize the original work . . . ." On July 5, 1989, 2 Live Crew's manager informed Acuff-Rose that 2 Live Crew had written a parody of "Oh, Pretty Woman," that they would afford all credit for ownership and authorship of the original song to Acuff-Rose, Dees, and Orbison, and that they were willing to pay a fee for the use they wished to make of it. Enclosed with the letter were a copy of the lyrics and a recording of 2 Live Crew's song. Acuff-Rose's agent refused permission, stating that "I am aware of the success [*573] enjoyed by 'The 2 Live Crews', but I must inform you that we can- not permit the use of a parody of 'Oh, Pretty Woman.'" Nonetheless, in June or July 1989, 2 Live Crew released records, cassette tapes, and compact discs of "Pretty Woman" in a collection of songs entitled "As Clean As They Wanna Be." The albums and compact discs identify the authors of "Pretty Woman" as Orbison and Dees and its publisher as Acuff-Rose. Almost a year later, after nearly a quarter of a million copies of the recording had been sold, Acuff-Rose sued 2 Live Crew and its record company, Luke Skyywalker Records, for copyright infringement. The District Court granted summary judgment for 2 Live Crew, 3 reasoning that the commercial purpose of 2 Live Crew's song was no bar to fair use; that 2 Live Crew's version was a parody, which "quickly degenerates into a play on words, substituting predictable lyrics with shock- ing ones" to show "how bland and banal the Orbison song" is; that 2 Live Crew had taken no more than was necessary to "conjure up" the original in order to parody it; and that it was "extremely un- likely that 2 Live Crew's song could adversely affect the market for the original." The District Court likely that 2 Live Crew's song could adversely affect the market for the original....
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This note was uploaded on 01/13/2012 for the course LAW 33800A taught by Professor Williamfisher during the Fall '10 term at Harvard.

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1994 Campbell - 1 LUTHER R CAMPBELL v ACUFF-ROSE MUSIC INC 510 U.S 569(1994 JUSTICE SOUTER delivered the opinion of the Court We are called upon to

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