PHY106Physical Quantities

PHY106Physical Quantities - Announcements The book A Tour...

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Unformatted text preview: Announcements The book A Tour of the Subatomic Zoo is at the SU Bookstore , not the Orange bookstore. (The SU Bookstore is the one in Schine) Frontiers of Science Lecture this Thursday at 7:30, Grant Auditorium. (Benefit of the doubt credits!) The Elegant Universe Brian Greene, Columbia University Lectures will be posted in the morning, so feel free to bring a printed copy with you to class. Sometimes they will be available the night before. FYI, When printing the PDF file for a lecture, you can print multiple slides to a sheet using the Printer Properties dialog box. Introduction to Physical Quantities Scalars Scalar quantities are those which are described solely by their magnitude Some examples are: Mass e.g. 14 [kg], 36 [lbs], Time e.g. 10 seconds, 40 minutes, Volume e.g. 1000 cm 3 , 4 litres, 12 gallons Temperature e.g 14 o F , 25 o C, Voltage e.g. 9 Volts, etc Vectors Vector quantities are those which need to be described by BOTH magnitude and direction Some of the most common examples which we will encounter are: Velocity e.g. 100 [mi/hr] NORTH Acceleration e.g. 10 [m/sec 2 ] at 35 o with respect to EAST Force e.g. 980 [Newtons] straight down (270 o ) Momentum e.g. 200 [kg m/sec] at 90 o . Some of the most common examples which we will encounter are: Velocity e.g. 100 [mi/hr] NORTH Acceleration e.g. 10 [m/sec 2 ] at 35 o with respect to EAST Force e.g. 980 [Newtons] straight down (270 o ) Momentum e.g. 200 [kg m/sec] at 90 o . Distance The separation between two locations. Distance can be measured in many types of units. We will mostly use: MKS Units millimeters [m] centimeters [cm] meters [m] kilometers [km], etc You should be comfortable with converting from [cm] to [m], [mm] to [km], and so on. We may use the symbolic notation d to mean a change in the position . The symbol should be read as the change in FYI : 1 [km] = 0.6 [mi] Time In physics, we are most often less interested in absolute time than changes in time, or a time interval. Time can be expressed in several units as well: seconds [sec] minutes [min] hours [hr] days years etc Example 1: How much time does it take for the earth to make one revolution?...
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PHY106Physical Quantities - Announcements The book A Tour...

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