Chap04_IM - Solutions to End-of-Section and Chapter Review...

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Solutions to End-of-Section and Chapter Review Problems 29 CHAPTER 4 4.1 (a) Simple events include tossing a head or tossing a tail. (b) Joint events include tossing two heads (HH), a head followed by a tail (HT), a tail followed by a head (TH), and two tails (TT). (c) Tossing a tail on the first toss 4.2 (a) Simple events include selecting a red ball. (b) Selecting a white ball 4.3 (a) 30/90 = 1/3 = 0.33 (b) 60/90 = 2/3 = 0.67 (c) 10/90 = 1/9 = 0.11 (d) 30 30 10 50 5 0.556 90 90 90 90 9 + - = = = 4.4 (a) 60/100 = 3/5 = 0.6 (b) 10/100 = 1/10 = 0.1 (c) 35/100 = 7/20 = 0.35 (d) 60 100 + 65 100 35 100 = 90 100 = 9 10 = 0.9 4.5 (a) A priori classical (b) Subjective (c) A priori classical (d) Empirical classical 4.6 (a) Mutually exclusive, not collectively exhaustive. “Registered voters in the United States were asked whether they registered as Republicans, Democrats, or none of the above.” will be mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive. (b) Not mutually exclusive, not collectively exhaustive. “Respondents were classified by country of manufacture of car owned and used for majority of their driving into the categories American, European, Japanese, or none of the above.” will be mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive. People can own more than one car but only one car can be used for majority of their driving. (c) Mutually exclusive, not collectively exhaustive. “People were asked, “Do you currently live in (i) an apartment, (ii) a house or (iii) none of the above?” will be mutually exclusive and collectively exhaustive. (d) Mutually exclusive, collectively exhaustive 4.7 (a) The joint probability of mutually exclusive events (being a Republican and a Democrat) is zero. (b) The joint probability of mutually exclusive events (being defective and not defective) is zero. (c) The joint probability of mutually exclusive events (being a Ford and a Toyota) is zero. 4.8 (a) “Makes less than $50,000”. (b) “Makes less than $50,000 and tax code is unfair”. (c) The complement of “tax code is fair” is “tax code is unfair”. (d) “Tax code is fair and makes less than $50,000” is a joint event because it consists of two characteristics or attributes.
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30 Chapter 4: Basic Probability 4.9 (a) P (tax code is unfair) = 600/1005 = 0.5970 (b) P (tax code is unfair and makes less than $50,000) = 280/1005 = 0.2786 (c) P (tax code is unfair or makes less than $50,000) = (600+505-280)/1005 = 0.8209 (d) The probability of “tax code is unfair or makes less than $50,000” includes the probability of “tax code is unfair”, the probability of “makes less than $50,000”, minus the joint probability of “tax code is unfair and makes less than $50,000”. 4.10
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This note was uploaded on 01/13/2012 for the course DCSI 3710 taught by Professor Pavur during the Fall '11 term at North Texas.

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Chap04_IM - Solutions to End-of-Section and Chapter Review...

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