Sensory Physiology - Sensory Physiology OBJECTIVES To understand the general properties of sensory systems and the range of complexity To know the

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BMED 3100 OBJECTIVES: To understand the general properties of sensory systems and the range of complexity To know the types of receptors and their function To understand receptive fields and basics of stimulus coding and processing To identify the order of signal propagation from the stimulus to the CNS Sensory Physiology sensory information primary sensory areas (initial processing) higher- order sensory areas (process input) association areas (link) higher- order motor areas primary motor cortex motor neurons
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BMED 3100
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BMED 3100 Sensory reception 1. Detection of stimulus energy by sensory receptors 2. Stimulus affects ionic permeability and membrane potential Sensory transduction 1. Resulting depolarizing current produces receptor (generator, graded) potential 2. Receptor potential triggers action potential if above threshold Amplification 1. The strengthening of stimulus energy that is detected by the nervous system 2. May be part of, or not part of, transduction Transmission 1. The conduction of sensory stimuli to the CNS 2. Some sensory receptors must transmit chemical signals to sensory neurons 3. Some sensory receptors are sensory neurons Integration 1. The processing of sensory information 2. Begins at sensory receptor Steps in Sensory Processing
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BMED 3100 Sensory Receptors: Transducers that convert stimuli into electrical signals Somatosensory receptors for somatic senses are simplest Naked nerve endings Nerve endings encased in connective tissue capsules Sense organs – specialized receptor cells (not necessarily neurons) synapsing onto sensory neurons Sensory receptors are either specialized endings of afferent neurons or separate cells that signal the afferent neuron.
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BMED 3100 Stimulus Coding and Processing Sensory Modality – specificity Location of the Stimulus – topographical
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This note was uploaded on 01/12/2012 for the course BMED 3110 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Sensory Physiology - Sensory Physiology OBJECTIVES To understand the general properties of sensory systems and the range of complexity To know the

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