Lecture notes 321 part 3 2011 (1)

Lecture notes 321 part 3 2011 (1) - ESR 321 Lecture Notes...

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ESR 321 Lecture Notes Portland State University Dr. Alan Yeakley 1 Outline – Part 3 of ESR 321 1. Background 2. Basin Geomorphology 3. Hydrologic Patterns 4. Water Quality 5. Riparian Forest Characteristics 6. Habitat Characteristics
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ESR 321 Lecture Notes Portland State University Dr. Alan Yeakley 2 1. Background - streams may be used as an indicator of watershed condition (aka “health”) - variability in stream types is due to physical factors including a. valley form b. stream size c. form of precipitation - “ ecological health ” is a term used to represent the degree to which functions/states such as biodiversity productivity biogeochemical cycles are in sync with that expected for ecosystems adapted to climatic and geologic conditions of a region on an evolutionary timescale - effective ecological management restores or maintains the ecological health of a given ecosystem
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ESR 321 Lecture Notes Portland State University Dr. Alan Yeakley 3 - management may be targeted toward various levels of an ecosystem - for watersheds in the Pacific NW, Naiman et al 1992 identified five important components, which will be outlined in the following notes <Table 6.1> 2. Basin Geomorphology 1 st and 2 nd order streams - greater than 70% cumulative stream length - only 10-20% of sediment yield is alluvial 3 rd to 5 th order streams - alluvial channels begin at 3 rd order streams - aggregation of boulders, cascade & pool sequences - majority of sediment is transported (low storage of sediment) 6 th and higher order streams - sediment supply is more steady in time - sediment is sorted by gradient - lateral migration occurs in flood plain
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ESR 321 Lecture Notes Portland State University Dr. Alan Yeakley 4 Erosion and sedimentation - provide sources and surfaces for habitat - large floods can create significant bank erosion - bedload waves - accelerates bank erosion - in mountain terrain, mass wasting is the dominant form of erosion - wildfires and timber harvest cause mass wasting 3. Hydrologic Patterns Timing and Quantity of Flow - snowpack delays timing of Q response to P - [Q peak /Q average ] larger in small watersheds
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This note was uploaded on 01/12/2012 for the course ESM 321 taught by Professor Environmentalsystem during the Winter '10 term at Portland State.

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Lecture notes 321 part 3 2011 (1) - ESR 321 Lecture Notes...

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