Lecture 11 Scientific writing

Lecture 11 Scientific writing - Guidelines for Writing...

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Guidelines for Writing Scientific Papers (Steingraber et al., 1985) "Write with precision, clarity and economy. Every sentence should convey the exact truth as simply as possible."
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As much effort and consideration should be given to the organization of the paper as was given to the execution of the study The writer should employ crisp sentences not cluttered with excess verbiage General Recommendations Scientific research demands precision. Scientific writing should reflect this precision in the form of clarity.
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The scientific paper has the following elements: Title Abstract Introduction Methods Results Discussion Literature Cited Format
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The title should contain three elements: The name of the organism studied; The particular aspect or system studied; The variable(s) manipulated. Title “The effect of timber harvest on fish in Oregon streams”
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The abstract is a one or two paragraph condensation (150- 200 words) of the entire work described completely in the article. It should be a self-contained unit capable of being understood without the benefit of the text. Abstract  
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The abstract should contain these four elements: the purpose of the study (the central question); a brief statement of what was done (Methods); a brief statement of what was found (Results); a brief statement of what was concluded (Discussion, in part). Abstract  
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The function of an introduction is to present the question being asked and place it in the context of what is already known about the topic.
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This note was uploaded on 01/12/2012 for the course ENVIRONMET 340 taught by Professor Dr.pan during the Winter '11 term at Portland State.

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Lecture 11 Scientific writing - Guidelines for Writing...

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