16 - Cancer

16 - Cancer - Cell Biology of Cancer Figure 20-2 Molecular...

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Cell Biology of Cancer
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Figure 20-2 Molecular Biology of the Cell (© Garland Science 2008)
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Figure 20-4 Molecular Biology of the Cell (© Garland Science 2008) Development and growth of the tumor
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Figure 20-3 Molecular Biology of the Cell (© Garland Science 2008) Cancer development proceeds through specific stages
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Metastatic tumor cells are invasive and can spread
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Figure 20-6 Molecular Biology of the Cell (© Garland Science 2008) Monoclonal (single-cell) origin of cancers
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Changes in cancer cells
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Proteins that control cell growth and proliferation
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Transformation of cultured cells into tumor cells Normal cells Transformed (tumor) cells Form monolayer. Then stop proliferating and arrest at G0 Keep proliferating and grow in several layers Normal cells can be transformed by infection of retrovirus (Rous sarcoma virus) or by transfection of DNA from human cancers
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Transformation of mouse cells was used to identify human oncogene
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Ras D mutant: constitutively active Ras (can not hydrolyze GTP, because can not bind GAP) Ras mediates signaling through RTK Identified oncogene: Ras D
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Figure 20-14, 20-40 Molecular Biology of the Cell (© Garland Science 2008) Two types of genes can be affected in cancers 1. Genes that promote cell proliferation and growth: abnormal activation (ras D ) 2. Gene that suppress proliferation and growth: abnormal inactivation (p53 -/- )
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Figure 20-27 Molecular Biology of the Cell (© Garland Science 2008) Oncogenes and tumor suppressors
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Oncogenic mutations in cell-surface receptors (RTK) Activation of RTK receptors
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Chromosomal translocation Oncogenic mutations in cell-surface receptors (RTK)
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by chromosomal translocation
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This note was uploaded on 01/12/2012 for the course BI 9 taught by Professor Aravin during the Spring '10 term at Caltech.

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16 - Cancer - Cell Biology of Cancer Figure 20-2 Molecular...

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