Notes02 - Honors 208W Fall 2011 Vision, Color, and...

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Unformatted text preview: Honors 208W Fall 2011 Vision, Color, and Illusions One of many optical illusions- http://www.physics.uc.edu/~sitko/LightColor/19-Perception/19-Perception.htm Notes 2005-2011 : Evan Golub (egolub@acm.org) ision: How we see The human eye allows us to see colors from red (low frequency) through violet (high frequency). Light passes through the front of our eye and focuses onto the retina. Notes 2005-2011 : Evan Golub (egolub@acm.org) he Eye: Overall structure http://webvision.med.utah.edu/imageswv/sagitta2.jpeg Notes 2005-2011 : Evan Golub (egolub@acm.org) Some parts of the eye Light comes in through the cornea and crystalline lens to reach the retina. Brightness and c o l o r are detected respectively by the rods and c o n e s on the retina. The fovea has the highest concentration of cones. an inspiration for the name of the Foveon sensor perhaps The iris opens/closes the pupil to determine how much light gets through. The lens can change its shape to help focus. some small camera lenses do this with liquid lenses Notes 2005-2011 : Evan Golub (egolub@acm.org) ods and Cones The human eye has approximately 120 million rods but fewer than 10 million cones (between 6 and 8 million). This makes a question such as how many megapixels does the human eye have a tricky one. There are three types of cones, each with a sensitivity to light of a different wavelength (short, medium, long). They are essentially red , green , and blue . We have around twice as many red cones and green, and around eight times as many green as blue. Notes 2005-2011 : Evan Golub (egolub@acm.org) ye -vs- Camera The cornea, crystalline lens, and ciliary muscles can be seen as the lens and focal ring on a camera. The iris and pupil can be seen as the diaphragm and aperture on a camera. The rods and cones on the retina can be seen as the sensor or film inside the camera body. Notes 2005-2011 : Evan Golub (egolub@acm.org) ow colors are captured and created Recall that most digital camera sensors are built so that each photosite captures a value in one color channel (red, green, or blue). The most common pattern is the Bayer pattern. The missing pixels in each color are filled in using algorithms to make a mathematically intelligent guess at what shade of the color in that spot would be based on the shades of the pixels around it. The three monochromatic images are then combined to create a single, full-color image. Notes 2005-2011 : Evan Golub (egolub@acm.org) xample from dpreview.com: http://www.dpreview.com/learn/?/Glossary/Camera_System/color_filter_array_01.htm Notes 2005-2011 : Evan Golub (egolub@acm.org) olor: Overview The spectrum of visible light goes from lower frequencies of around 780 nanometers (red - 620...
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This note was uploaded on 01/13/2012 for the course HONR 208W taught by Professor Golub during the Fall '11 term at Maryland.

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Notes02 - Honors 208W Fall 2011 Vision, Color, and...

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