np - CMSC 451: The classes P and NP Slides By: Carl...

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CMSC 451: The classes P and NP Slides By: Carl Kingsford Department of Computer Science University of Maryland, College Park Based on Section 8.3 of Algorithm Design by Kleinberg & Tardos.
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Computational Complexity We’ve seen algorithms for lots of problems, and the goal was always to design an algorithm that ran in polynomial time. Sometimes we’ve claimed a problem is NP-hard as evidence that no such algorithm exists. Now, we’ll formally say what that means.
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Decision Problems Decision Problems: Usually, we’ve considered optimization problems: given some input instance, output some answer that maximizes or minimizes a particular objective function. Most of computational complexity deals with a seemingly simpler type of problem: the decision problem. A decision problem just asks for a yes or a no . We phrased Circulation with Demands as a decision problem.
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Optimization Decision Recall this problem from a few weeks ago: Weighted Interval Scheduling Given a set of intervals { I i } each with a nonnegative weight w i , find a subset of intervals S such that i S w i is maximized. We can change this into a decision problem by asking: Weighted Interval Scheduling Given a set of intervals { I i } each with a nonnegative weight w i , is there a subset of intervals S such that i S w i is greater than C .
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Decision is no harder than Optimization The decision version of a problem is easier than (or the same as) the optimization version. Why, for example, is this true of Weighted Interval Scheduling?
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Decision is no harder than Optimization The decision version of a problem is easier than (or the same as) the optimization version. Why, for example, is this true of Weighted Interval Scheduling? If you could solve the optimization version and got a solution
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This note was uploaded on 01/13/2012 for the course CMSC 423 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '07 term at Maryland.

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np - CMSC 451: The classes P and NP Slides By: Carl...

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