che106_Lecture17pt2

che106_Lecture17pt2 - Chemistry 106 Lecture 17 part 2 The...

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Chemistry 106 Lecture 17 part 2
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The Main-Group Elements The physical and chemical properties of the main- group elements clearly display periodic behavior. Variations of metallic-nonmetallic character are periodic. (More metal–like as you go down a group.)
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Properties of Metal, Nonmetals, and Metalloids
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Metals vs. Nonmetals Differences between metals and nonmetals tend to revolve around these properties.
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Metals vs. Nonmetals Metals tend to form cations (+). Nonmetals tend to form anions (-).
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irst Ionization Energies of Metals vs. Nonmeta The first ionization energies for metals are much lower than those of nonmetals. METALS NONMETALS Since it is easy to remove electrons from metals, they tend to form cations (+) .
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Metals They tend to be lustrous (shiny), malleable (sheets), ductile (wires), and good conductors of heat and electricity.
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Metals Compounds formed between metals and nonmetals tend to be ionic . Most metal oxides function as bases . Nitric Acid Water NiO (Nickel oxide) Metal oxide + acid → salt + water NiO( s ) + 2HNO3( aq ) → Ni(NO3)2( aq ) + H2O( l )
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These are dull, brittle substances that are poor conductors of heat and electricity. They tend to gain electrons in reactions with metals to acquire a noble gas configuration. Nonmetals tend to have very negative electron
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This note was uploaded on 01/15/2012 for the course CHE 106 taught by Professor Freedman during the Fall '08 term at Syracuse.

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che106_Lecture17pt2 - Chemistry 106 Lecture 17 part 2 The...

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