How to handle an angry boss

How to handle an angry boss - Chapter 6.3 New research from...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 6.3 New research from a team of Stanford researchers shows that the state of mind in which a person listens to an angry outburst has a big effect on whether or not they actually get upset. It gives some clues to help anyone lessen the impact of being yelled at, either by an angry boss or an angry spouse. A common technique often recommended by cognitive-behavioral therapists tries to give people a different framework through which to view an angry person. So if someone is yelling at you, you might tell yourself that they've just received some bad news about their job or about a family member, and are now taking it out on you. The Stanford research seems to show that this technique also works if applied pre-emptively - before the angry outburst has even begun. Jens Blechert, who led the research , refers to this process of rationalizing someone else's outburst as reappraisal. This is how he suggests the brain handles such information: You can see this as a kind of race between the emotional information and the reappraisal...
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This note was uploaded on 01/13/2012 for the course 620 300 taught by Professor Gordon during the Fall '10 term at Rutgers.

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How to handle an angry boss - Chapter 6.3 New research from...

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