Fictions of Justice Presentation

Fictions of Justice Presentation - FictionsofJustice

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Fictions of Justice   International Criminal Court and the Challenge of  Legal Pluralism in Sub-Saharan Africa  By: Kamari Maxine Clarke 
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Background to ICC  Formed, during 1990s, in response to tribunals limited  abilities to try crimes committed only within a specific  time-frame and during a specific conflict.   First permanent, treaty based, international criminal court  established to end impunity for the perpetrators of the  most serious crimes of concern to the international  communities. Roman Statue: legal basis for the permanent  establishment of the ICC
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Introduction T
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Fictions of Justice “The way justice is made real is its concealments of other  justice narratives or its monopoly of symbolic and  enforced power to exercise the authorial meaning of  justice” They enact as fictions when these symbols begin to question  the constructions of other truths Conceptions of justice are defined in opposition to one another  Ł  “incommensurable”  
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Antecedents to the ICC  Former Yugoslavia – Serbian President Slobodan  Milosevi Ethnic cleansing (deaths of ethnic Croatians, most notably  the Albanians)   Rwanda (Tutsis vs. Hutus) – Jean-Paul Akayesu Didn’t stop to end violence or call for help Sierre Leone – Charles Taylor (President of Liberia) Financing extreme rebel groups to monopolize diamond  resources   
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“Individualization of  Responsibility”  Persecuting certain individuals who were held most responsible  for the crimes that occurred
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This note was uploaded on 01/14/2012 for the course AAS 103 taught by Professor Omoladeadunbi during the Fall '11 term at University of Michigan.

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Fictions of Justice Presentation - FictionsofJustice

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