Reading Response #2

Reading Response #2 - John Yim AAS 103 Professor Adunbi...

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John Yim AAS 103 Professor Adunbi September 10, 2011 Reading Response on Jelin’s “Politics of Memory” In “The Politics of Memory,” Elizabeth Jelin explicates the denouncement and comforting of the human rights movement during the dictatorship in Argentina. The human rights movement was initially thought to be homogenous; that the main reason for the mobilization of human rights was as result of those directly affected by the military regime. These people included primarily those who were in search for their detained or disappeared kin. It wasn’t until the late 1970s that claims of human rights became more pervasive and heterogeneous. The movement became related to internal cleavages that related to both the affected and unaffected. Jelin defines that it is the result of these disparities in political orientations that led to the divergence of unity within the movement. Jelin explains that these discrepancies were a result from the enduring consequences of repression and the contingent nature of memory. She then explores how these memories and
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Reading Response #2 - John Yim AAS 103 Professor Adunbi...

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