Lecture - Cancer

Lecture - Cancer - Cancer...

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Cancer http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/ho me/common/cancer/risk/159.html
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Malignant Tumor Masses of altered cells that divide abnormally Potentially lethal
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Neoplasms Abnormal masses of cells that ignore controls over growth and division Benign neoplasms stay put, don’t spread; examples are moles and other tumors Malignant neoplasms are cancers (carcinomas). Their cells break away and invade other tissues giving rise to more abnormal masses.
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Cancer and the Cell Cycle http://www.geocities.com/CollegePark/Lab/1580/cycle.html
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Check Point Genes The cell cycle has built in check points controlled by specific genes. These check point genes are the basis for the mechanisms that advance, delay or block the cell cycle
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p 53 p 53 is an example of a checkpoint gene. Its product puts the brake on cell division when chromosomes are damaged. Controls the G1 to S transition Cell cycle will not continue until DNA damage it repaired. Most common gene associated with cancer http://www.geocities.com/CollegePark/Lab/1580/p53.html
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p 53 Damage When both genes for p 53 are damaged, the cell can grow abnormally. This damaged cell’s daughter cells will grow abnormally and so on… p 53 normally will keep the cell from passing on damaged DNA to daughter cells In many cases DNA damage is so great that p 53 programs “cell suicide” (apoptosis) p 53 is a type of tumor suppressor gene
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Oncogenes Many cancers are known to arise through mutations (changes in genes) in one or more checkpoint genes. Oncogenes are mutated genes that have the potential to induce cancer. These are growth factor genes that are over expressed.
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Mutagens Mutagens are chemical or physical factors which can cause changes in genes (mutations) Ultraviolet radiation, x-rays, asbestos, substances in tobacco smoke to name a few….
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Most neoplasms that become malignant are cell lines that have accumulated several mutations (9-12). Usually it takes the passage of time to
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This note was uploaded on 01/13/2012 for the course IS 3020 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Kennesaw.

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Lecture - Cancer - Cancer...

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