William Wordsworth - The World is Too Much With Us; Late and Soon

William Wordsworth - The World is Too Much With Us; Late and Soon

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"THE WORLD IS TOO MUCH WITH US; LATE AND SOON" by William Wordsworth Composed 1806.--Published 1807 The world is too much with us; late and soon, Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers: Little we see in Nature that is ours; We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! This[1] Sea that bares her bosom to the moon; The winds that will be howling at all hours, And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers; For this, for every thing, we are out of tune; It moves us not.--Great God! I'd rather be A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn; So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,[A] Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
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Unformatted text preview: Have sight of Proteus rising[2] from the sea;[B] Or hear old Triton blow his wreathd horn.[C] Editors notes: The "pleasant lea" referred to in this sonnet is unknown. It may have been on the Cumbrian coast, or in the Isle of Man. I am indebted to the Rev. Canon Ainger for suggesting an (unconscious) reminiscence of Spenser in the last line of the sonnet. Compare Dr. Arnold's commentary (_Miscellaneous Works of Thomas Arnold_, p. 311), and that of Sir Henry Taylor in his _Notes from Books_.--ED. VARIANTS: [1] 1807. The . .. MS. [2] 1827. ... coming . .. 1807. FOOTNOTES:...
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William Wordsworth - The World is Too Much With Us; Late and Soon

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