HFRP - Coffman, J. (2002, May). Public communication...

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Coffman, J. (2002, May). Public communication campaign evaluation: An environmental scan of challenges, criticisms, practice, and opportunities. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Family Research Project. Presents what has been happening in the field of public communication campaign evaluation in recent years. It examines evaluation challenges, criticisms, and practice and includes sections on relevant theory, outcomes, and useful methods for designing evaluations. It ends with opportunities for the road ahead. PUBLIC COMMUNICATION CAMPAIGN EVALUATION An Environmental Scan of Challenges, Criticisms, Practice, and Opportunities Prepared for the Communications Consortium Media Center By Julia Coffman Harvard Family Research Project May 2002
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I. II. III. IV. V. SUMMARY…………………………. ...................................................................... 2 A. Individual Behavior Change Campaigns . ....................................................... 4 B. Policy Change Campaigns . ............................................................................. 4 PUBLIC COMMUNICATION CAMPAIGNS. ..................................................... 4 A. Two Types of Campaigns . .............................................................................. 5 B. Individual Behavior Change Campaigns . ........................................................ 6 C. Public Will Campaigns . ................................................................................... 7 D. Campaigns Types and Evaluation . ............................................................... 10 EVALUATION CHALLENGES AND CRITICISMS. ....................................... 11 A. Evaluation Challenges and Stumbling Blocks . .............................................. 11 B. “Front End” versus “Back End” Evaluation . ................................................... 12 C. Different Perspectives and Criticisms of the Field. ........................................ 14 CAMPAIGN EVALUATION PRACTICE. ........................................................... 17 A. Theory . .......................................................................................................... 17 B. Outcomes and Measures. .............................................................................. 20 C. Methods. ........................................................................................................ 24 OPPORTUNITIES AND THE ROAD AHEAD. ................................................... 29 REFERENCES. .................................................................................................. 34
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Harvard Family Research Project 2 SUMMARY A. INTRODUCTION As public communication campaigns grow more sophisticated and strategic, evaluation is not keeping pace with their innovation. While funders are asking for more information on results, evaluators are grappling with how to make their way in this developing and challenging field. They are trying to understand the strategies and theories that guide campaigns and how to choose the right outcomes and methods to assess them. B. PUBLIC COMMUNICATION CAMPAIGNS A. Definition – Public communication campaigns use the media, messaging, and an organized set of communication activities to generate specific outcomes in a large number of individuals and in a specified period of time. They are an attempt to shape behavior toward desirable social outcomes. To maximize their chances of success, campaigns usually coordinate media efforts with a mix of other interpersonal and community-based communication channels. B. Individual Behavior Change and Public Will Campaigns – There are two main types of campaigns: 1) individual behavior change campaigns that try to change in individuals the behaviors that lead to social problems or promote behaviors that lead to improved individual or social well-being; and 2) public will campaigns that attempt to mobilize public action for policy change. Public will campaigns are less understood, but are increasing rapidly in number.
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HFRP - Coffman, J. (2002, May). Public communication...

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