LectureNoteswithoutImages 2.25.01 PM

LectureNoteswithoutImages 2.25.01 PM - Lecture Notes...

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1 Lecture Notes Veterinary Histology VMED 7123 Dr. Charlotte L. Ownby Fall Semester 2004 For Lecture Notes with Color Images use go to: http://www.cvm.okstate.edu/instruction/mm_curr/histology/Hi stologyReference/index.htm Under Course Outline, double click on Organ System of Interest
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2 Digestive System I - lips, tongue, salivary glands, esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines The digestive system includes the gastrointestinal tract as well as associated organs like the pancreas and liver. Digestive System I will cover the oral cavity (lips, tongue, major salivary glands) and the gastrointestinal tract, i.e. esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines. The digestive system consists throughout most of its length of a series of tubular organs lined with specific types of epithelium to fulfill specific functions related to the digestion and absorption of nutrients from a food source and the elimination of waste products. Organ Fu Function n c tion Lips Ingestion and fragmentation of food Teeth Fragmentation of food Tongue Fragmentation and swallowing Salivary Glands Fragmentation and moistening of food; swallowing Esophagus Passage of food from oral cavity to the stomach Stomach Completion of fragmentation and beginning of digestion Small Intestine - duodenum Digestion; emulsificaton of fats by enzymes from the pancreas and bile from the liver Small Intestine - jejunum & ileum Completion of digestion and absorption Large Intestine- cecum Absorption of water from liquid residue Large Intestine - colon Absorption of water from liquid residue Large Intestine - rectum Storage of feces prior to defecation Anus Route for defecation of feces outside the body Oral Cavity Organs that make up the oral cavity include the lips, teeth, tongue and major salivary glands. These organs function to obtain and ingest food, fragment it into smaller particles, moisten and swallow it. Teeth will not be covered in this course. Lips
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3 The lips aid in obtaining food and placing it in the mouth so that the teeth and tongue can manipulate it and begin fragmenting it. Lips are covered by a stratified squamous epithelium that is usually keratinized on the outer surface and contains many hairs whereas the epithelium on the inner surface is more moist and non-keratinized. Tongue The tongue is a highly muscular organ used to manipulate food in the mouth and for the sense of taste. It is covered with stratified squamous epithelium that in the anterior part forms specialized structures known as papillae that are involved in the manipulation of food as well as in the sense of taste. The skeletal muscle of the tongue is unique in that it runs in three different directions allowing for a wide range of movements needed to properly manipulate foodstuffs. The types, numbers and distribution of papillae in the tongue vary greatly among species. In domestic animals there are usually five different types of papillae. 1.
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This note was uploaded on 01/16/2012 for the course BI 200 taught by Professor Potter during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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LectureNoteswithoutImages 2.25.01 PM - Lecture Notes...

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