syllabus_cellinjurydeath

syllabus_cellinjurydeath - Cell Injury Cell Death January...

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Unformatted text preview: Cell Injury Cell Death January 3 & 5, 2006 Nelson Fausto, M.D. C-516 [email protected] Study Guide: Syllabus, lectures and reading materials The syllabus for Cell Injury and Cell Death covers the material to be presented at the lectures on this topic (Jan. 3-5). The textbook reading for these lectures is Chapter 1 of Robbins and Cotran, 7th edition. Alcohol abuse coverage is Chapter 9, p421-424. The presentation of material in the syllabus and lectures may not follow the exact order of presentation of the material in the textbook. Nevertheless, there are no conflicts in concepts between the syllabus and textbook. The information is easy to locate in Robbins. As you study the material, use the lecture presentations and the syllabus as a guide for what to emphasize. The material presented in the syllabus and lectures is, however, required knowledge. The most important goal is to gain a general understanding of cellular adaptations, cell injury and the two types of cell death, known as necrosis and apoptosis. I will not cover in the lectures or syllabus some of the topics presented in the textbook. For these topics, I expect you to know the meaning of some terms (this includes heterophagy/autophagy, cytoskeletal abnormalities, intracellular accumulations of cholesterol, protein, glycogen, pigments and calcification). You should be able to define and recognize these types of injury. I also suggest that you take a look at Chapter 3 p90-94, to become familiar with tissue homeostasis, stem cells and cloning. The study of cell injury and cell death is the basis for the understanding of disease mechanisms. It is interesting and essential material for medical practice and medical science. I hope that you will enjoy studying these topics, as I do teaching this material, which is both basic science and clinical medicine. At the end of the syllabus (Appendix 1) you will find some clinically relevant questions related to the lectures. Nelson Fausto, M.D. "One can be fooled by appearances, which happens only too frequently, whether one uses a microscope or not" (Voltaire) "...can the human soul be glimpsed through a microscope? May be, but you'd definitely need one of those very good ones with two eyepieces" (Woody Allen) 1 "You can observe a lot by watching" (Yogi Berra) 2 1. Pathology Study of disease process as to: 1. Causes (etiology) 2. Mechanisms of development (pathogenesis) 3. Structural and functional alterations (consequences and clinical significance) 2. The goals of this series of lectures are: • To define and describe in general terms physiological adaptations, reversible and irreversible injury and cell death. • To study the causes and mechanisms of cell death....
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syllabus_cellinjurydeath - Cell Injury Cell Death January...

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