224Week2Lecture12005-1

224Week2Lecture12005-1 - Biology 224 Human Anatomy and...

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Biology 224 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Week 2; Lecture 1; Monday Dr. Stuart S. Sumida Heart & Great Vessels: Structure, Function, Development
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INTRODUCTION TO BLOOD VESSELS
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Blood vessels – tubular structures, with particular named layers from innermost to outermost: INNERMOST Tunica Intima (has three subcomponents): Inner lining of simple epithelial cells attached to a basement membrane. Middle layer of fine connective tissue made up of collagen. Internal elastic lamina – outer elastic layer Tunica Media – smooth muscle, elastic fibers, other connictive tissue components. Tunica Adventitia (or Tunica Externa )– mostly elastic and collagenous fibers. (In large vessels this layer has dedicated nerves, tiny blood vessles and lymphatics. OUTERMOST
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Tunica intima Tunica media Tunica externa (adventicia)
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Tunica intima Tunica media Tunica adventicia
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The TUNICA MEDIA is relatively much thinner in veins. Veins usually have little or not smooth muscle, expect in the largest of veins. Veins have periodic valves to prevent backflow.
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Extremely thin tunica media in a vein.
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ARTERIES to ARTERIOLES Smallest definable arteries are arterioles. They have relatively more smooth muscular tissue, less elastic tissue. Thus, they are more easily regulated by (autonomic) nervous control. Very smallest arterioles (terminal arterioles): Have no internal elastic layer. Tunica media densely supplied with sympathetic nerve fibers .
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VEINS TO VENULES Some veins to have smooth muscle in them (the very largest). Have same layers as arteries, but tunica media is much thinner. Have relatively less elastic tissue. Operate at low pressure. Have periodic bicuspid-shaped valves to prevent backflow. Smallest (venules) receive capillary blood – have no tunica media .
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Capillaries: Blood to capillaries from arterioles . Smallest and thinnest of vessels. Usually constructed of only a single layer of tunica intima. Greatest loss of blood pressure is at capillaries.
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This note was uploaded on 01/16/2012 for the course BI 200 taught by Professor Potter during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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224Week2Lecture12005-1 - Biology 224 Human Anatomy and...

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