BIOL 111X+Human Anatomy and Physiology I+Hoffman Woldstad+201003

BIOL 111X+Human Anatomy and Physiology I+Hoffman Woldstad+201003

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1 Human Anatomy & Physiology I Course Manual BIOL 111x (4 credits) University of Alaska Fairbanks Fall 2010 Megan Hoffman & Theresa Woldstad *This syllabus is modified from a syllabus courtesy of Dr. Abel Bult-Ito.
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2 Table of Contents Page Description of Human Anatomy & Physiology I 3 Lecture 3 TurningPoint Clickers 3 Hands-on experience 4 Instructors Lecture Instructors 4 Teaching Assistants 5 Course Meeting Times and Locations 5 Resources Digital Resources 5 Electronics in the Classroom 5 Disability Services 5 Support Services 6 Course Requirements & Grading Course Requirements 6 Partial Exams 6 Final Exam 6 Impromptu Performance Assessments 6 Laboratory Practicals 7 Laboratory Participation 7 General Exam / Laboratory Practical Information 7 Grading 8 General Course Information Lecture Schedule 9 Lab Schedule 10 Exam Schedule 12 How to Get the Most Out of the Course 12 How to Get Information on Human Anatomy & Physiology I 13 Student Code of Conduct 14 Student Behavioral Standards 15
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3 Description of Human Anatomy & Physiology I Welcome to Human Anatomy & Physiology I! During this semester we are going to explore an integrated view of the structure and function of human cells, tissues and organs, the integument, the skeletal and muscular systems, and the nervous system. This course will incorporate lectures, discussions, and weekly laboratories into a dynamic class atmosphere. The objectives of this course are to understand the following concepts: Chemistry and biochemistry underlie the basic functional properties of a cell; and cells are the building blocks of tissues, organs, and the whole organism. Structure and function of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. The integration of structures and functions of the various tissues and organ systems in the body is the basis for how you behave, feel, perceive your surroundings, and learn about the concepts presented in this course. This course also fulfills Natural Science Core Curriculum requirements. Additional student learning outcomes include and are not limited to an understanding of basic biological concepts, how the human body and mind are connected, an ability to critically evaluate health related issues in the popular and scientific literature, and to obtain a solid basis for more in depth study of human anatomy and physiology. We will use a variety of approaches to understand these concepts and achieve the learning outcomes: Lecture. In lecture, we will talk about the basic concepts in Human Anatomy & Physiology. This style of teaching encompasses both auditory and visual learning styles. Another important source for this information is from written material. The main text we will use is Principles of Anatomy and Physiology by Gerard J. Tortora and Bryan Derrickson (2009, 12th Edition; John Wiley & Sons, Inc.). I will try to get the PowerPoint presentations of the lectures up at least a day in advance on the BIOL 111x Black Board site at http://classes.uaf.edu.
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BIOL 111X+Human Anatomy and Physiology I+Hoffman Woldstad+201003

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