Surface Anatomy

Surface Anatomy - Human Anatomy First Edition McKinley...

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1 1 Human Anatomy, First Edition Chapter 13 Lecture Outline: Surface Anatomy 13-2 Surface Anatomy ± A branch of gross anatomy that examines shapes and markings on the surface of the body as they relate to deeper structures. ± Essential in locating and identifying anatomic structures prior to studying internal gross anatomy. ± Health-care personnel use surface anatomy to help diagnose medical conditions and to treat patients. 13-3 Surface Anatomy ± four techniques when examining surface anatomy ± visual inspection ± directly observe the structure and markings of surface features ± palpation ± feeling with firm pressure or perceiving by the sense of touch) ± precisely locate and identify anatomic features under the skin ± percussion ± tap sharply on specific body sites to detect resonating vibrations ± auscultation ± listen to sounds emitted from organs
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2 4 5 13-6 Cranium ± Cranium (cranial region or braincase) is covered by the scalp, which is composed of skin and subcutaneous tissue. ± Cranium can be subdivided into three regions, each having prominent surface anatomy features. ± the frontal region of the cranium is the forehead ± covering the frontal region is the frontalis muscle, which overlies the frontal bone ± the frontal region terminates at the superciliary arches
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3 13-7 Face – The Auricular Region ± Composed of the visible surface structures of the ear as well as the ear’s internal organs, which function in hearing and maintaining equilibrium. ± Auricle, or pinna, is the fleshy part of the external ear. ± Within the auricle is a tubular opening into the middle ear called the external auditory canal. ± The mastoid process is posterior and inferior to the auricle. 13-8 The Face – Orbital (or Ocular) Region ± Includes the eyeballs and associated structures. ± Surface features protect the eye. ± Eyebrows protect against sunlight and potential mechanical damage. ± Eyelids close reflexively to protect against objects moving near the eye. ± Eyelashes prevent airborne particles from contacting the eyeball. ± The superior palpebral fissure, or upper eyelid crease. ± Asians do not have a superior palpebral fissure 13-9 The Face – Nasal Region ± Contains the nose. ± the bridge; it is formed by the union of the nasal bones ± The fleshy part of the nose is called the dorsum nasi. ± The tip of the nose is called the apex. ± Nostrils, or external nares, are the paired openings into the nose. ± Ala nasi (wing of the nose) forms the flared lateral margin of each nostril.
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4 13-10 The Face – Oral Region ± Inferior to the nasal region. ± Includes the buccal (cheek) region, the fleshy upper and lower lips (labia), and the structures of the oral cavity (mouth) that can be observed when the mouth is open. ± The vertical depression between your nose and upper
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This note was uploaded on 01/16/2012 for the course BI 200 taught by Professor Potter during the Fall '11 term at Montgomery College.

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Surface Anatomy - Human Anatomy First Edition McKinley...

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