CDR - . . . . . . . . . AAE 490T/590T AT 490D Tech 581N...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
. . . . . . . . . AAE 490T/590T AT 490D Tech 581N Design/Build/Test Critical Design Report on Seraphim Program (VTOL Aircraft) Date March 08 th , 2003 Name Hours worked Signature Brent Robbins 20 + X Chris Fisher 20 + X See-Chen Lee 20 + X
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
. . . . . . . . . Brent Robbins Chris Fisher See-Chen Lee March 08, 2003
Background image of page 2
AAE 490T Seraphim Program Critical Design Review Introduction Brief Objective Over a period of eight weeks an aircraft was designed to meet a series of design requirements. The most unique of these requirements is an aircraft capable of vertical take off and landing. This type of aircraft is one met with much difficultly in the past, but we feel that with an innovated design and modern controls we will succeed. The primary use of the aircraft is for civilian transportation; therefore its properties reflect a safe and user friendly goal. The proposed aircraft will use a tandem wing configuration and four ducted fans. Its take off stability will be simplified due to the use of the four fans rather than three or less. Brief History Important Aircrafts to Consider To design this aircraft a review of past designs and concepts was done in search of inspiration and insight. In addition to all of the major military VTOL aircrafts, three aircrafts were reviewed in much detail. The Ryan XV-5A, Vanguard Omniplane, and the Viking Dragonfly are planes that have design characteristics that are important to our all aircraft. We will briefly review these aircrafts and their desired properties. 1
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Vanguard Omniplane The first aircraft reviewed was the Vanguard model 2C Omniplane. It used a 25 ft long fuselage and weighed about 2600lbs. The most distinguishing features are its round wings which each housed a 6ft diameter three bladed propeller. The aircraft was powered by a 265 hp Lycoming O-540-AIA six-cylinder piston engine. Upon reaching target altitude vertically, covers above the rotors and louvers below sealed the wing for aerodynamic lift. This feature is something that we wish to include in our aircraft. (http://208.56.150.96/wheel/wheel.htm) The Vanguard Omniplane is important to us because it utilizes the concept of “fan in wing” which is what we want in our VTOL aircraft. Having passed all ground and hover standards to NASA’s satisfaction we can conclude that this technology has the ability to be stable and safe for public use. 2
Background image of page 4
GE – Ryan XV – 5A The next aircraft is a great example of the possibilities with the fan in wing concept. In November 1961, General Electric was contracted to develop its first fan-in-wing concept, the XV-5A. Design, construction and flight testing of the aircraft was sub-contracted to Ryan, but GE retained responsibility for the propulsion system and its integration into the aircraft. The XV-5 was 44 ft long with a 30 ft wingspan. Each wing housed a 5 ft diameter fan provided vertical lift. A smaller fan in the nose of the aircraft gave pitch control and additional lift. The fans, providing a total vertical thrust
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 36

CDR - . . . . . . . . . AAE 490T/590T AT 490D Tech 581N...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online