part_detect_paper - SSC02-IX-4 1 M.Dowler 16 th Annual/USU...

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Unformatted text preview: SSC02-IX-4 1 M.Dowler 16 th Annual/USU Conference on Small Satellites Design and Test of a Solid State Charged Particle Detector for Cubesat Michael Dowler, Victor Aguero*, Stephen Sears, Robert Twiggs**, Jim Albers, Kathy Lee, Gordon Maahs Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Sunnyvale, CA * Stanford Research Institute ** Stanford University, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Space Systems Development Laboratory Correspondence should be directed to Michael Dowler at 5383 Larch Grove Place, San Jose, CA 95123 408-742-9832 (work) michael.g.dowler@lmco.com Abstract A solid state boron-ion implanted silicon Charged Particle Detector (CPD) was designed, built, and tested as one of the payloads for a Stanford University/Lockheed Martin Cubesat (10cm cube, 1 Kg) project intended for a low earth orbit. Design drivers to be discussed will include cost, size, mass and schedule. Two detectors were utilized with shielding to allow for two separate energy ranges to be detected. Stanford Research Institute facilities were used for testing. Design considerations will be discussed relating to tuning of the electronics for various low earth orbit altitudes, along with matching voltage requirements for the electronics with a low power, 3.7 Volt spacecraft bus (1 watt). Other payloads include a developmental sun sensor and Honeywell 3 axis solid state magnetometer. Overall cubesat development will also be discussed, including structure, communications, power, and processor. Testing techniques and current results will be shown for this ongoing project. Introduction A Lockheed Martin/Stanford University joint project was established in 2001 to become the core curriculum of a Certified Spacecraft Design Engineer program. Twenty-three Lockheed Martin engineers were the students, divided into 4 teams. Professor Robert Twiggs of the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Space Systems Development Laboratory is the professor of this currently ongoing project. Two teams are flying an Aerospace, Corp. payload of an accordion style deployable solar array. The other team is flying an extremely sensitive magnetometer in order to detect extremely low frequency magnetic fields which are released prior to an earthquake. For our project, called Hypercube (Team 1), the original design drivers included cost ($5K for one engineering unit and one flight unit), schedule (two academic quarters) and size (10cm cube, 1 Kg). Much later in the development phase these dimensions were increased to 4 by 5 by 5 and 1.25 Kg in order to accommodate the Aerospace Corp- developed launcher for a possible shuttle launch. This indicated a non-developmental, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) component selection. Three payloads were also chosen; a magnetometer, developmental sunsensor, and a charged particle detector (CPD). 2 M.Dowler 16 th Annual/USU Conference on Small Satellites The mission of the Hypercube project is both scientific and technology development....
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This note was uploaded on 01/15/2012 for the course AAE 490 taught by Professor Andrisani during the Fall '09 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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part_detect_paper - SSC02-IX-4 1 M.Dowler 16 th Annual/USU...

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