ENG 208 Oedipus

ENG 208 Oedipus - English 208 Oedipus The King 1. Oedipus...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
English 208 Oedipus The King 1. Oedipus is a classic example of situational Irony (the consequences of an action are opposite of the intent). How do Oedipus’ actions lead to his prophesied fate? After successfully solving the Sphinx’s riddle, Oedipus is revered for his intelligence and courage, by the people of Thebes. When the city is struck by a plague, the Chorus pleads to the gods for help and deliverance. Spurred on by arrogance, Oedipus mocked the Chorus, saying he would answer their prayers. Oedipus sends Creon to the Oracle at Delphi to seek the means to help the city. The oracle states that the plague will be over when the murderer of Laius, the previous King of Thebes, is found, banished or “pay back blood with blood (Oedipus 113).” In Oedipus’ eagerness to remain the city’s hero and deliverer, he seeks to find the murderer. In doing so, Oedipus speaks to the citizens of Thebes, offering exile only to the murderer if he turns himself in, rewards to those with information, and a curse upon the murderer. Oedipus even
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/14/2012 for the course ENG 208 taught by Professor Brewington during the Spring '11 term at Piedmont TC.

Page1 / 4

ENG 208 Oedipus - English 208 Oedipus The King 1. Oedipus...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online