Lecture 6 - Lecture 6: Introduction to electronic analog...

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Lecture 6: Introduction to electronic analog circuits 361-1-3661 1 Our aim is to develop and analyze basic double-transistor circuits. We will see that there are only five basic circuit topologies. A wide majority of all the analog transistor circuits, no matter how many transistors in each, can be divided in elementary blocks based on either the previously studied single-transistor topologies or on the five basic double-transistor topologies. 5.1. Five basic topologies of double-transistor circuits The five basic double-transistor topologies (see Fig. 1) include all the possible relative positions of the transistors. It is obvious that due to a variety of interconnections between the transistors, the number of double-transistor circuits is much greater than five, but we will consider only the most generic ones. The first topology in Fig. 1 we have already used in the current mirror (see the previous lecture). 5.2. Active load Our aim here is to reach the highest small-signal voltage gain for a given supply voltage, V CC , and the static output voltage of the amplifier in the nearly middle of its range: V O =0.5 V CC . We will define resistive loads as static ones since there is no difference between their static and dynamic values, and we will define loads that do differ in the values of their static and dynamic impedances as active or dynamic ones. To understand the difference between an amplifier with a static (resistive) and active (dynamic) load, let us first find the maximum small-signal voltage gain of the elementary CE amplifier, with a static load, (see Fig. 2), assuming that V O =0.5 V CC , 200 20 2 ) || ( 10 K 300 2 o = = = = = = = = = << CC CC CE o C V CC T CC V V T CE C T C C m r R o C m v V V V V V R V I R g r R g A . (1) As one can see from (1), the small-signal voltage gain of the elementary CE amplifier depends solely on its voltage supply, V CC . Since V CC is limited, the voltage gain is limited too.
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This note was uploaded on 01/14/2012 for the course EE 361-1-3711 taught by Professor Prof.eugenepaperno during the Fall '11 term at Ben-Gurion University.

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Lecture 6 - Lecture 6: Introduction to electronic analog...

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