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Lecture22 - Lecture 22 Background reading Berg et al Pages...

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Lecture 22 11/23/11 Background reading: Berg, et al: Pages 328 - 340 Garrett and Grisham: Pages 219 - 220 Pages 227 - 228 Outline: Polysaccharides Classes of glycans N -linked glycoproteins O -linked glycoproteins Glycosaminoglycans Glycolipids Examples of biologically relevant glycans Lectins
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Polysaccharides Large polymers of monosaccharides. Glycogen and starch are both large polymers of glucose and play important roles in energy storage. Both of these polysaccharides contain glucose residues linked with α -1,4-glycosidic bonds. They also contain branches in which the glucose chains are linked with α -1,6-glycosidic linkages. Glycogen, which is in animals, contains more branches (about one branch every 10 sugars) than starch which has about one branch every 30 sugars.
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Another important polysaccharide of glucose is cellulose , which is a linear polymer of β -1,4-linked glucose residues. The strands of cellulose are linear due to the β -1,4-glycosidic linkage and these strands hydrogen bond with one another to form fibers that have a high tensile strength. Cellulose plays an important structural role in plant cell walls.
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