extra credit assignment - (were pointing at jersey!) 1...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
(we’re pointing at jersey!) 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
(that’s beautiful Canada…I never knew it was that close) The Wayne plant is still open and is just recently retooled. It is currently the flexible final assembly factory for Ford. It assembles Expedition and Lincoln Navigators. I personally do not foresee any kind of Ford assembly plants in Michigan ten years from now. Even though it is very difficult to predict what the economy is going to be like in such a late future, especially the world economy, there are many variables involved. However, given the past thirty years of jobs just being lost in America to over poorer countries because communication and transportation is so much more accessible, there does not seem to be much business sense for Ford to continue to have these plants in dead cities. It would take some really radical events for countries such as Mexico to catch up or even go past America’s current market because they are so interwoven together. Mexico relies on the Unites States too much and so even ten years from now, that will change. It would have been completely unrealistic for all the black people that worked at Ford’s plants that lived in the Black Bottom to move into the neighborhoods that are close by to the Inkster Plant. Those neighborhoods were already incredibly overpopulated. Furthermore, Ford was extremely 2
Background image of page 2
xenophobic, clearly demonstrated by his “The Dearborn Independent”. Ford did not particularly care about the personal welfare of his employees, he just wanted to cars at an efficient rate. When I crossed from Inkster to Dearborn, it was pretty obvious the differences. In Inkster you saw a lot of pretty cheap low quality stores. Many of the stores were not even close together; you would drive past a gas station and then maybe like 1/10 mile later you see a motel. It was pretty empty too. The cars were in general pretty old looking. Not to say that Dearborn was the best place ever too, but it was pretty obvious. I did notice that Dearborn had more township-like buildings whereas I did not really see that in Inkster. However, I did pass by an abortion clinic on the end of Schafer road, so that left a deep impression on me for the area of Dearborn that I was in. The narratives in the museum give a very positive view of Ford, despite his obvious racist, xenophobic, anti-Semitic history. It is not really surprising, however, that there really is not much mentioning of how he opposed blacks working in his plants to live in Dearborn. The policies that were really emphasized were those of national progression and how his “Fordism” really shaped American culture for the better. This is not really surprising at all though because one would expect the entire museum to show the good side of Ford rather than passages about his association with Hitler. I really enjoyed the “With Liberty and Justice for all” exhibit. I, personally, just enjoyed the fact that even though the Rosa Parks Bus was located in the civil rights section, the votes for women
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/16/2012 for the course SOCIOLOGY 102 taught by Professor Mcgan during the Fall '10 term at University of Michigan.

Page1 / 10

extra credit assignment - (were pointing at jersey!) 1...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online