Exam 3 Review.docx - Exam Three Proctored Exam all students should have already had information regarding proctored exams 35 questions worth 35 points

Exam 3 Review.docx - Exam Three Proctored Exam all students...

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Exam Three: Proctored Exam- all students should have already had information regarding proctored exams. 35 questions worth 35 points you will have 75 minutes to take this exam. Items on the Exam are from Week 10-11, which includes information from course PowerPoints, readings, course text and all other material covered in weeks 10-11. Please note: If you have difficulty during the exam call Toll-free: 1-855-577-2039 or through the direct link (this could be faster): Support Center: . (Links to an external site.) Be sure to review guidelines for diseases and conditions Presenting signs and symptoms Think about your case studies Diagnostic testing Differential Diagnosis for common Renal and Men’s Health Treatment regimens utilizing updated guidelines found in your PowerPoints for common disorders and diseases seen in clinic. Exam 3 Outline: Main Topics Renal Problems Dysuria Subjective experience of pain or a burning sensation on urination Frequency, urgency, hesitation Can be secondary to several medical conditions or certain medications Most commonly associated with lower urinary system infections Dysuria: Differential Diagnosis Most often associated with a bladder problem and rarely with renal disease Inflammatory lesions of the prostate, bladder, and urethra Other conditions associated with dysuria Bladder tumors Chronic renal failure Nephrolithiasis Disease of upper urinary system Outside the renal system STIs Vaginitis and prostatitis Women should be questioned about vaginal discharge or irritation Symptoms may lead to other diagnoses
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Urethral strictures Prolapsed uterus Pelvic peritonitis Cancer of the cervix or prostate Dysuria: Testing Urinalysis is the easiest, most noninvasive, and most economical way to identify UTIs and other renal problems. Once the associated condition is identified, appropriate treatment can begin. Lower Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Occurs when the normal sterile condition of the urinary tract is invaded by pathogenic bacteria Urethra: urethritis Bladder: cystitis Bladder wall: interstitial cystitis (IC) Prostate gland: prostatitis Acute infections Characterized by the onset of UTI in a previously symptom-free individual What tests would you order to diagnose? What results would make you suspect UTI? Chronic infections Caused by obstructions, antibiotic-resistant bacteria, presence of multiple strains of bacteria Complicated UTI Accompanied by factors that complicate the infection Lower UTI: Epidemiology and Causes More prevalent in sexually active adults, very young children, and frail older adults Other predisposing conditions Suppressed immune system Pregnancy Urinary obstruction Catheter dependency Neurogenic bladder Diabetes mellitus Lower UTI: Pathophysiology Usually occurs as a result of contamination from the patient’s own gastrointestinal tract
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