stoichiometry2010preap

stoichiometry2010preap - Stoichiometry Composition...

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Unformatted text preview: Stoichiometry Composition Stoichiometry Avogadro’s Number and the Mole Percentage Composition and Empirical Formulas Molecular Formulas Reaction Stoichiometry Stoichiometrical Calculations Limiting Reagents Percent Yield Avogadro’s Number and the Mole Matter is made up of different kinds of particles. The term representative particle refers to whether a substance commonly exists as atoms, formula units, or molecules. A representative particle is the smallest particle of a substance that has all of the properties of that substance. Representative Particles Elements The atom is the representative particle of most elements. Representative Particles Diatomic Molecules and Molecular Compounds The molecule is the representative particle of the diatomic elements (Hydrogen, bromine, oxygen, nitrogen, fluorine chlorine and iodine) and of molecular compounds. Reminder: Molecular compounds are also called covalent compounds. They are made of nonmetals covalently bonded together. Representative Particles Ionic Compounds The formula unit is the representative particle of ionic compounds. Reminder: Ionic compounds consist of oppositely charged ions. This generally refers to a metal and a nonmetal or a metal and a polyatomic ion. Identfiy the representative particle for each of the following substances: CO2 Na2SO 4 Br 2 Na Molecule, molecular compound Formula unit, ionic compound Molecule, diatomic molecule Atom, element The Mole The mole (mol) is the SI unit for the amount of substance. A mole of any substance contains 6.02×1023 representative particles of that substance. This is known as Avogadro’s Number . Avogadro’s Number 1 mole = 6.02×1023 atoms (element) 1 mole = 6.02×1023 molecules (molecular compound or diatomic molecule) 1 mole = 6.02×1023 formula units (ionic compound) Molar Mass The molar mass of a substance is the mass in grams of one mole of that substance . The units for molar mass are g/mol . Molar Mass of an Element The molar mass of an element is numerically equal to the atomic mass of an element in atomic mass units (which can be found on the periodic table). What is the molar mass of lithium? 6.94 g/mol What is the molar mass of carbon? 12.01 g/mol Molar Mass of a Compound or a Diatomic Element The molar mass of a compound or a diatomic element is calculated by adding together the masses of the elements in a mole of the molecules or formula units that make up the substance. Molar Mass Calculations What is the molar mass of oxygen gas?...
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This note was uploaded on 01/15/2012 for the course CHEM 101 taught by Professor Curtis during the Spring '11 term at Austin Community College.

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stoichiometry2010preap - Stoichiometry Composition...

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