Group Leadership Strategies

Group Leadership Strategies - McGregor CODE – ORANGE...

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Unformatted text preview: McGregor CODE – ORANGE (PLAN & TEACH) UNIT – Officer Selection & Training LESSON TITLE – Group Leadership Strategies SEQUENCE – 5 of 5 OBJECTIVES – Upon completion of this lesson the user will be able to: 1. Select an appropriate leadership style for a collegiate organization; 2. Identify and place individuals into group/team roles; 3. Develop questions that improve/stimulate discussion; 4. Describe how to improve the quality of participation in meetings; and 5. List the ways an individual can become a better participant of a group/team. REFERENCES, TOOLS, AND EQUIPMENT – Morrison, E. K. (1994). Leadership skills: Developing volunteers for organizational success. Fisher Books. Reardon, M. & Derner, S. (2004). Strategies for great teaching. Chicago: Zephyr Press. 5 Pre-Selected and Trained Individuals Markers Tape Plenty of Blank Paper (To make signs to be placed around the meeting room and for participants to write on) Flip Chart or Dry Erase/Chalkboard KEY TERMS – None BACKGROUND INFORMATION Now that you have studied some information pertinent to the dynamics of a group, it is time to gain insight on how to better lead your group/team. OBJECTIVE 1 - Select an appropriate leadership style for a collegiate organization Being a leader of a group is definitely an educational experience! Unfortunately, a person’s first leadership experience may not be the most positive if they select and apply an inappropriate leadership style. To lead is to serve a group of stakeholders/constituents/clientele. Too many times young leaders fall into the trap of thinking that a leadership role puts them at the front of the line or allows them to, “be the boss.” Leaders that have this mindset, especially when leading peers, typically lose support and an ineffective organization could result. Leaders in collegiate organizations tend to be peers and at the most, upperclassmen. Therefore, it is important to remember that an effective leader in a peer-oriented situation may play more of a servant/facilitator/participant role, rather than that of an authoritarian role. Five common leadership styles include: • Authoritative : The leader makes all decisions and delivers them to the group without choices. • Political : The leader makes all decisions for the group, but sells or convinces the group to accept the decisions. • Evaluative : The leader presents ideas and invites the group to ask questions to evaluate what is proposed. • Participative : The leader develops a number of courses of action and the group decides on the one that best fits the organization. • Laissez-fair : The group develops the ideas and makes all decisions. Keep in mind that successful leaders always listen to the wishes of those they serve and know when to mix leadership styles in different situations and with different personality styles. Also, leaders experience the most success when all members of a group/organization/team are involved in making decisions and buy into the process. group/organization/team are involved in making decisions and buy into the process....
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This note was uploaded on 01/16/2012 for the course ED 590 taught by Professor Kylemcgregor during the Spring '09 term at Tarleton.

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Group Leadership Strategies - McGregor CODE – ORANGE...

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