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Experimental Sample 4

Experimental Sample 4 - The Effects of Appearance on...

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1 “The Effects of Appearance on Assistance at a University Setting” An Experimental Study NAME REMOVED TO PRESERVE ANONIMITY Introduction: It seems that everyone wants to assume that if someone is in need of assistance that others will help regardless. This statement may not be completely true. There has been a rapidly increasing body of literature that indicates that physical attractiveness cues generate specific evaluations and impressions that could have an effect on if or how much help they might receive when in need (Benson, Karabenick, & Lerner, 1976). However, research on physical attractiveness and helping behavior has not clearly answered the question of whether attractiveness influences assistance (Wilson 1978). Hartz (1996) defines attractive characteristics as those that make one person appear pleasing to another. They include, but are not limited to, physical appearance. He goes on by saying that “the weight that society gives to each of the many characteristics that potentially contribute to attractiveness has profound implications for functioning of society” (Hartz 1996). All of this has alluded to the onset of this project to try to answer that question at Tarleton State University. Purpose: The purpose of this study will be to determine if appearance has an affect on the number of people that will assist an individual at Tarleton State University. Hypothesis: There will be no significant difference between the number of people who help a girl who is dressed up compared the same girl who is dressed down at Tarleton State University. Methodology: The selected population for this project consisted of students, faculty, staff, and visitors at Tarleton State University on (Day 1) Tuesday November 21 st from 9:30am to 12:15pm and (Day 2) Wednesday November 22 nd from 9:30am to 12:15pm. A posttest-only control group design was used. Participants were assigned randomly exposed to one of two treatments. The first treatment (T1)
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