Cross Plains Interview Manual

Cross Plains Interview Manual - ' Cross Plains High School...

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Unformatted text preview: ' Cross Plains High School Interview Handbook Site-Base Committee Sample Interview Questions for Teachers What made you decide to become a teacher? What courses in your college education best prepared you for teaching? How have your past job experiences (or education) prepared you directly or indirectly for this position? Tell me about your job at ? What were some of the problems you encountered on the job, and how did you solve them? How do you manage your time in order to complete the many tasks required in teaching? What are your strong points as a teacher? Weak Points? How would you describe your teaching style? In the classroom, how do you provide for the large range of student abilities? Leaming styles? What are the most important things you expect students in your classroom to learn? What system of classroom management works best for you? What techniques do you use to encourage discouraged learners? What kind of grouping do you use in your classes? . How do you teach concepts to students whose reading level is below grade level? On what basis do you evaluate and grade students? How do you help students to become increasingly more responsible for their own behavior? What role do you see the parent/guardian playing in the students’s education? How do you communicate student progress and/or problems to parents? What gains would you expect your students to make after having you for a year? 13 If I were to ask other teachers with whom you have worked to describe you, what would they say? What kind of administrative support would enable you to do your best job in the classroom? What subjects did you enjoy most in college and which were most difficult for you? Looking back, how do you explain those difficulties? Under what conditions do you feel you learn best? Which teachers stand out in your memory and what about them causes you to remember them? - Do you believe your grades in college reflect your ability accurately? Why do you believe this? Describe some extracurricular activities which you feel helped to develop some of your talents more fully. If you had the opportunity to do it all over again, how would you pursue your educational goals differently? What kind of people rub you the wrong way? Why? Of all your disappointments, who do you think was most responsible for them? What does "success" mean to you? Tell me about some teaching situation you have been through during which you were tense and uncomfortable. What caused these situations? How did you react? What kind of challenge does most to bring out your potential? What are your future plans for self improvement? What conditions would exist when you will consider yourself as "having arrived” in your profession? How do. you handle it when time for social and family commitments conflict with time needed for your work? 14 Tell me about the kind of person who you think could best supervise you in your work? Do you see yourself as a team member or individual achiever? Why do you see yourself this way? Tell me about the type of student you think you could‘teach most effectively. Tell me how you go about planning your lessons for the year. Tell me how you would go about individualizing instruction. Is it important to you whether or not your students like you? Why? What about teaching do you enjoy most? What in teaching do youenjoy least? How do you react to praise? How freely do you give praise? Describe the circumstances around your leaving your last job. If a parent came to you and complained that what you are teaching is not meeting the needs of his child, how would you respond? 15’ CLOSE ENDED QUESTIONS Do you feel you are qualified for this position? Did you get along with your last supervisor? Do you consider yourself a good decision maker? Are you ambitious? Can you accept criticism? l6 1. OPEN ENDED QUESTIONS How have your past job experiences prepared you, directly or indirectly, for this position? How would you describe your last supervisor? What methods do you use to make decisions? What is your interpretation of success? Give some examples of how you have reacted to criticism. Minimize the Legal Risks in Interviewing Principals and campus teams who interview prospective employees must be aware of what constitutes unlawful discriminatory practices. Rational discrimination is legal and is based on factors directly related to successful performance on the job. Irrational discrimination prohibited by law, is based on factors not necessarily related to successful job performance. The Equal Pay Act of 1963 prohibits employers from paying unequal wages to male and female employees who perform substantially the same job. The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII) prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, religion and national origin. The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 prohibits discrimination based on age, and protects people 40 years of age and older, making it unlawful for an employer to refuse to hire or to discharge any individual or discriminate against any individual with respect to compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment because of the individual’s age. The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination of qualified individuals with handicaps, solely by reason of the handicap, from participating in or from receiving the benefits of any program or activity receiving federal funds. (Section 504) The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 prohibits disparate treatment of women affected by pregnancy, childbirth, or medical conditions for employment related purposes. The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with a disability who, with or without reasonable accommodation, can perform the essential functionof a position. ‘ In summary, to avoid legal risks in interviewing: Ask only job-related questions: avoid the protected categories of sex, race, age, national origin, handicap and religion. Be consistent with all applicants interviewed. Carefully document what is done in the employment process. Pie-Employment Inquiries Key: The question must be related to the applicant’s ability to do the job; can the applicant perform the "essential functions" of the job. The criteria must be consistently applied to all persons seeking the position. Specific Inquiries to be Avoided Questions about marital status, pregnancy, childbearing plans, number and age of children, child care arrangements, number of times married, marital or financial status of parents, spouse’s occupation, number and ages of siblings. Questions about appearance and personal history, such as height and weight, military rank, type of military discharge, financial status, color of hair and eyes, mandatory photos. Questions about irrelevant educational history information (Criteria for low-skills jobs are studied more carefully by the courts.) Questions about irrelevant associational activities or religious affiliation. General questions about physical impairments. Permissible Inquiries Questions about the ability to do the job, including college hours and grades, certification, work history, current job status, relevant job training (including training in the military), experience in dealing with particular types of problems or situations, such as a hostile parent, or a need for student motivation. Questions indicating whether the person can perform the "essential functions" of the job. (For a custodian: "Are there any limitations that would not allow you to lift a 30-lb. mop bucket?") Special questions about relatives on the school board, outside business activities that may interfere with the applicant’s ability to perform the job, felony convictions or convictions of crimes involving moral turpitude. Note: A conviction should not automatically preclude hiring. The nature and date the offense and the relationship to the position being sought should be considered. Questions Subject to Possible Litigation 1. What is your age? 2. What is your date of birth? 3. Do you have children? If so, how old are they? 4. What is your race? 5. What church do you attend? 6. Are you married, divorced, separated, widowed or single? 7. Have you been arrested? Have you ever been charged with a serious crime? 8. To what clubs or organizations do you belong? 9. Do you rent or own your own home? 10. What does your wife (husband) do? 11. Have your wages ever been attached or garnished? 12. What was your maiden name (in interviews with applicants)? 13. How is your health? 14. How tall are you? How much do you weigh? 15. Are you pregnant? Do you plan on becoming pregnant? 16. What is your native language? 17. What is the name and address of your nearest relative to be notified in case of an emergency? ' 18. Do you have a recommendation from your current employer? 19. ‘ We play a lot of football games on Saturday and some are out of town. You will be able to take your turn as chaperon? 20. Are you related to the Mr. Jones that works for us? 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. . 35. 36. 37. Are you disabled? Do you have a disability? Do you have a visual, speech, or hearing disability? What is the extent of any disability you may have? How severe is any disability you may have? How long have you had a disability? Have you ever been treated for any of the following diseases? epilepsy muscular dystrophy multiple sclerosis AIDS cancer heart disease diabetes emotional illness high blood pressure any other disease Do you wear contact lenses? Are you night blind? Do you smoke? Please list any diseases for which you have been treated in the past two years. Have you been identified as a carrier of a disease-associated gene? Have you ever been hospitalized? Have you ever suffered any mental impairment or been treated for any mental conditions? ' Have you ever been treated by a psychiatrist or psychologist? If so, for what condition? Are you on any medication? Are you taking any prescribed drugs? 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 45. Have you ever been treated for drug addiction or alcoholism? Have you ever filed for workers’ compensation insurance? Is there any health related reason you might not be able to perform the job for which you are applying? Have you been unable to hold a job because of: (a) sensitivity to chemicals, dust, etc.? (b) inability to perform certain motions? (c) inability to assume certain positions? (d) other medical reasons? Have you ever been a patient in a mental hospital or sanitarium? Have you ever been rejected for, or discharged from, military service because of physical, mental or other reasons? - Have you ever filed charges or claimed damages because of injury? Have you ever had back trouble? SUMNIARY The interview is a selection instrument; therefore, it must be fair, reliable, and valid. Plan your interview and stick to a consistent pattern. Collect only data which relates directly to the critical dimensions. Do not make a decision until all areas have been covered. Document your data. 23 Cross Plains High School Interview Name Position » for which the applicant is applying. 1 Rate the applicant in each area on scale -worst 4 -best 1. Overall appearance of applicant? 1 2 3 4 i 2. Does the Applicant meet the guidelines for NCLB? 1 2 3 4 3. Will this person improve the academic for Cross Plains High School? 1 2 3 4 4. Did the interview go well? 1 2 3 4 5.Will the Applicant add value to CPHS? . 1 2 3 4 6. Will the applicant be able to work with present staff, faculty and administration? 1 2 3 4 7. Rate the applicant overall? 1 2 3 4 ...
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Cross Plains Interview Manual - ' Cross Plains High School...

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